1887

Chapter 3.10 : Ocular Cultures

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Ocular Cultures, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818814/9781555818814_Chap3.10-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555818814/9781555818814_Chap3.10-2.gif

Abstract:

Ocular infections are defined by the anatomic structures that are affected. A wide variety of microorganisms cause both acute and chronic eye infections, but many noninfectious inflammatory diseases may also involve one or more parts of the ocular system. An excellent description of the anatomy of the eye and the specific types of clinical infection that occur at specific ocular structures and the tissues surrounding the eye is provided in , by Gray et al. ( ). It is clinically relevant to divide eye infections into those that involve superficial structures (i.e., eyelids, lacrimal system, and the orbital and periorbital soft tissues) and inner eye structures (sclera, cornea, iris, anterior and posterior chambers, lens, vitreous, retina, choroid, uvea, macula, fovea, and optic nerve) ( Table 3.10–1 and Table 3.10–2 ). Whereas superficial eye infections are usually due to bacteria that colonize the skin, inner eye infections may involve a wide variety of organisms, including bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses ( ). Early clinical and laboratory diagnosis of inner eye infections is paramount to the patient having a good outcome. Inner eye infections should be urgently identified and treated to prevent loss of visual acuity or, in the most severe cases, loss of the eye itself ( ).

Citation: Church D. 2016. Ocular Cultures, p 3.10.1-3.10.10. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.10
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555818814.chap3.10
1. Gray LD, Gilligan PH, Fowler WC. 2011. Cumitech 13B, Laboratory Diagnosis of Ocular Infections. Coordinating ed, Snyder WJ. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
2. CLSI. 2004. Quality Assurance for Commercially Prepared Microbiological Culture Media, 3rd ed. Approved standard M22-A3. CLSI, Wayne, PA.
3. Chern KC, Meisler DM, Hall GS, Myers SM, Foster RE, Zakov ZN, Lowder CY. 1996. Bacterial contamination of anaerobic vitreous cultures: using techniques employed for endophthalmitis. Curr Eye Res 15:697699.
4. Hall GS, Pratt-Rippin K, Meisler DM, Washington JA, Roussel TJ, Miller D. 1994. Growth curve for Propionibacterium acnes. Curr Eye Res 13:465466.
5. Yuksel D, Hazirolon D, Sungur G, Duman S. 2012. Actinomyces canaliculitis and its surgical treatment. Int Ophthalmol 32:183186.
6. Brook I, Frazier EH. 1998. Aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of dacrocryocystitis. Am J Ophthalmol 125:552554.
7. Funke G, Pagano-Niederer M, Bernauer W. 1998. Corynebacterium macginleyi has to date been isolated exclusively from conjunctival swabs. J Clin Microbiol 36:36703673.
8. Armstrong RA. 2000. The microbiology of the eye. Ophthalmic Physiol Opt 20:429441.
9. Baum J. 1995. Infections of the eye. Clin Infect Dis 21:479486.
10. Brady SE, Cohen EJ, Fischer DH. 1988. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic postoperative bacterial endophthalmitis. Ophthalmic Surg 19:590594.
11. Brook I. 1980. Anaerobic and aerobic flora of acute conjunctivitis in children. Arch Ophthalmol 98:833835.
12. Brook I. 1988. Presence of anaerobic bacteria in conjunctivitis associated with wearing contact lenses. Ann Ophthalmol 20:397399.
13. Donzis PB, Mondino BJ, Weissman BA. 1988. Bacillus keratitis associated with contaminated contact lens care systems. Am J Ophthalmol 105:195197.
14. Friedlaender MH. 1995. A review of the causes and treatment of bacterial and allergic conjunctivitis. Clin Ther 17:800810.
15. Israele V, Nelson JD. 1987. Periorbital and orbital cellulitis. Pediatr Infect Dis 6:404410.
16. Joondeph BC, Flynn HW, Miller D, Joondeph HC. 1989. A new culture method for infectious endophthalmitis. Arch Ophthalmol 107:13341337.
17. Kinnear FB, Kirkness CM. 1995. Advances in rapid laboratory diagnosis of infectious endophthalmitis. J Hosp Infect 30(Suppl):253261.
18. Klotz SA, Penn CC, Negvesky GJ, Butrus SI. 2000. Fungal and parasitic infections of the eye. Clin Microbiol Rev 13:662685.
19. Kresloff MS, Castellarin AA, Zarbin MA. 1998. Endophthalmitis. Surv Ophthalmol 43:193224.
20. Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R (ed). 2009. Mandell, Douglas and Bennett’s Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, 7th ed. Churchill Livingstone, New York, NY.
21. McNatt J, Allen SD, Wilson LA, Dowell VR. 1978. Anaerobic flora of the normal human conjunctival sac. Arch Ophthalmol 96:14481450.
22. Okhravi N, Adamson P, Lightman S. 2000. Use of PCR in endophthalmitis. Ocul Immunol Inflamm 8:189200.
23. Perkins RE, Knudsin RB, Pratt MV, Abrahamsen I, Leibowitz HB. 1975. Bacteriology of normal and infected conjunctiva. J Clin Microbiol 1:147149.
24. Smith RE, Nobe JR. 1989. Eye infections, p 213232. In Finegold SM, George WL (ed), Anaerobic Infections in Humans. Academic Press, Inc, New York, NY.
25. Smolin G, Tabbara K, Witcher J. 1984. Infectious Diseases of the Eye. The Williams & Wilkins Co, Baltimore, MD.
26. Weissgold DJ, D’Amico DJ. 1996. Rare causes of endophthalmitis. Int Ophthalmol Clin 36:163177.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 3.10−1

Clinical descriptions of common superficial ocular infections

Citation: Church D. 2016. Ocular Cultures, p 3.10.1-3.10.10. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.10
Generic image for table
Table 3.10–2

Clinical description of common inner eye infections

Citation: Church D. 2016. Ocular Cultures, p 3.10.1-3.10.10. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.10
Generic image for table
Table 3.10–3

Handling of specimens for diagnosis of ocular infections

Citation: Church D. 2016. Ocular Cultures, p 3.10.1-3.10.10. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.10

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error