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Chapter 3.3 : Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures

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Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The initial processing of clinical specimens for bacteriology is a multifaceted endeavor involving a number of decision-making steps, including the need for processing the specimen for anaerobic bacteriology, mycology, virology, and parasitology, depending on the nature of the specimen ( ). The need for direct tests, such as Gram stains, must also be considered. These issues will determine whether the specimen requires any pretreatment before inoculation.

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
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Figures

Image of Figure 3.3.1–1
Figure 3.3.1–1

Appropriate method to streak plate for isolation of bacteria. Inoculate first quadrant with a few drops or pieces of specimen or by rolling a swab on a small area.

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
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Image of Figure 3.3.1–2
Figure 3.3.1–2

Inoculation of biplate, often used for specimens from sterile sites when blood agar and CHOC are needed. To avoid cross contamination of media with plate contaminants, always use a separate loop or flame loop between inoculation of each side of plate.

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
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Image of Figure 3.3.1–3
Figure 3.3.1–3

Optional method of streaking plate for throat cultures.

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
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Image of Figure 3.3.1–4
Figure 3.3.1–4

Alternative for detection of on BAP (e.g., respiratory specimens).

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
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Image of Figure 3.3.1–5
Figure 3.3.1–5

GasPak envelopes in airtight jar, used to produce 5 to 7% CO atmosphere.

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 3.3.1–1

Common laboratory media used for aerobic cultures

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
Generic image for table
Untitled

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
Generic image for table
Table 3.3.1–2

Order of specimen processing for bacteriology when multiple specimens are received at the same time

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
Generic image for table
Table 3.3.1–3

Recommended aerobic culture media for inoculation of common clinical specimens

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
Generic image for table
Table 3.3.2–1

Terms to describe gross colonial morphology

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
Generic image for table
Table 3.3.2–2

Enumeration guidelines

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
Generic image for table
Table 3.3.2–3

Colonial morphology on primary media

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
Generic image for table
Table 3.3.2–4

Commonly used primary plating media

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3
Generic image for table
Table 3.3.2–5

Common pathogens and rapid and conventional methods to identify them when suspected from colony morphology listed in Table 3.3.2–3

Citation: Church D. 2016. Processing, Isolation, Detection, and Interpretation of Aerobic Bacteriology Cultures, p 3.3.1.1-3.3.2.15. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch3.3

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