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Chapter 4.11 : Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli

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Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria are part of the microbiota of the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital tract ( ). Many taxonomic changes have been instituted based on newer biochemical and molecular sequencing considerations. There are new genera and species for “old names” and newly described organisms, and these will only increase in numbers as better culture techniques and more advanced methods for molecular identification and/or matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALTI-TOF) are utilized ( ). These changes have made understanding current taxonomy and correlating old and new names in the clinical literature more difficult for laboratorians and clinicians alike. Clinical decisions still require accurate, timely identification of clinically relevant anaerobic pathogens by the clinical microbiology laboratory. We, as laboratorians, need to keep abreast of the changes and relay those changes as efficiently as possible to our colleagues in a manner that maintains the old and new; i.e., always consider sharing with clinicians the old and new genera, for example, so that they can associate the two. Table 4.11–1 gives information about some of the changes in taxonomy of the anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli.

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
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Figures

Image of Figure 4.11–1
Figure 4.11–1

Flow chart using reaction to special potency disks (kanamycin, vancomycin, and colistin) to assist in what group of Gram-negative bacillus an isolate falls into and what table in procedure 4.11 would be useful for further identification. Pos, positive; Neg, negative; GNR, Gram-negative rods; R, resistant; S, susceptible.

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
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Image of Figure 4.11–2
Figure 4.11–2

Identification of spp. Pos, Positive; Neg, negative. ONPG, -nitrophenyl-β--galactopyranoside.

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
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Image of Figure 4.11–3
Figure 4.11–3

Identification of spp. Some spp. of animal origin that may be recovered from bite infections are not listed. Pos, positive; Neg, negative.

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
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Image of Figure 4.11–4
Figure 4.11–4

Identification of pigmented spp. Pos, positive; Neg, negative.

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
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Image of Figure 4.11–5
Figure 4.11–5

Identification of the group. Pos, positive; Neg, negative. Includes species of Bacteroides and the newly named Parabacteroides.

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
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References

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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 4.11–1

Changes in taxonomy among the anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
Generic image for table
Table 4.11–2

Characteristics of clinically relevant spp.

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
Generic image for table
Table 4.11–3

Characteristics of the including group, and species renamed into other genera

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
Generic image for table
Table 4.11–4

Characteristics of spp. of human origin

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
Generic image for table
Table 4.11–5

Characteristics of pigmented and saccharolytic spp.

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
Generic image for table
Table 4.11–6

Characteristics of 20% bile-sensitive, nonpigmented, and saccharolytic spp.

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11
Generic image for table
Table 4.11–7

Characteristics of other anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli

Citation: Hall G. 2016. Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli, p 4.11.1-4.11.17. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.11

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