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Chapter 4.15 : as a Pathogen Involved in Antimicrobial Agent-Associated Diarrhea, Colitis, and Pseudomembranous Colitis

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as a Pathogen Involved in Antimicrobial Agent-Associated Diarrhea, Colitis, and Pseudomembranous Colitis, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

is the major cause of nosocomial diarrhea and the primary pathogen responsible for pseudomembranous colitis. In the United States, there are >300,000 cases per year of antimicrobial agent-associated diarrhea, colitis, or pseudomembranous colitis caused by this organism and its toxins. In a recent review article, one hospital reported that medical expenditures associated with -associated disease were almost $1,000,000 per year and a another review article suggested that that health care costs in the United States were approaching $1 billion annually ( ). can also be a rare cause of abscesses, wound infections, osteomyelitis, pleuritis, peritonitis, septicemia, and urogenital tract infections; for isolation and identification of in these extraintestinal sites, see procedure 4.12, which covers anaerobic Gram-positive bacilli.

Citation: Hall G. 2016. as a Pathogen Involved in Antimicrobial Agent-Associated Diarrhea, Colitis, and Pseudomembranous Colitis, p 4.15.1-4.15.7. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.15
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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 4.15–1

Comparison of available NAATs for detection of toxigenic

Citation: Hall G. 2016. as a Pathogen Involved in Antimicrobial Agent-Associated Diarrhea, Colitis, and Pseudomembranous Colitis, p 4.15.1-4.15.7. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.15
Generic image for table
Table 4.15–2

Comparison of NAAT methods for detection of toxigenic

Citation: Hall G. 2016. as a Pathogen Involved in Antimicrobial Agent-Associated Diarrhea, Colitis, and Pseudomembranous Colitis, p 4.15.1-4.15.7. In Leber A (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch4.15

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