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Chapter 6.2 : Specimen Examination and Primary Isolation

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Specimen Examination and Primary Isolation, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Aerobic actinomycetes cause a variety of infections in humans: respiratory, cutaneous (such as mycetoma, lymphocutaneous and superficial skin [abscess or cellulitis] infections, or secondary cutaneous involvement with disseminated disease), and disseminated, with a marked tropism to the central nervous system, from a primary pulmonary infection. See Appendix 6.6.1–1 at the end of this section for a list of etiologic agents and the sites most commonly associated with these infections.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Specimen Examination and Primary Isolation, p 6.2.1-6.2.7. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch6.2
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Figures

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Figure 6.2–1

Abbreviated flowchart for isolation of aerobic actinomycetes ( ).

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Specimen Examination and Primary Isolation, p 6.2.1-6.2.7. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch6.2
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References

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1. McNeil MM, Brown JM. 1994. The medically important aerobic actinomycetes: epidemiology and microbiology. Clin Microbiol Rev 7:357417.
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3. Kaämpfer P, Andersson MA, Rainey FA, Kroppenstedt RM, Salkinoja-Salonen M. 1999. Williamsia muralis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from the indoor environment of a children’s day care centre. Int J Syst Bacteriol 49:681687.
4. Atlas RM, Snyder JW. 2010. Reagents, stains, and media: bacteriology, p 272–307. Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 10th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
5. Haley L, Callaway C. 1978. Laboratory Methods in Medical Mycology. US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare publication no. 78-8361. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.
6. Vickers RM, Rihs JD, Yu VL. 1992. Clinical demonstration of isolation of Nocardia asteroides on buffered charcoal-yeast extract media. J Clin Microbiol 30:227228.
7. Bartholomew JW. 1962. Variables influencing results, and the precise definition of steps in Gram staining as a means of standardizing the results obtained. Stain Technol 37:139155.
8. Becker B, Lechevalier MP, Gordon RE, Lechevalier HA. 1964. Rapid differentiation between Nocardia and Streptomyces by paper chromatography of whole-cell hydrolysates. Appl Microbiol 12:421423.
9. Chandler FW, Kaplan W, Ajello L. 1980. A Color Atlas and Textbook of Histopathology of Mycotic Diseases. Wolfe Medical Publications, London, United Kingdom.
10. Chapin KC, T-L Lauderdale. 2007. Reagents, stains, and media: bacteriology, p 334–364. In Murray PR, Baron EJ, Jorgensen JH, Landry ML, Pfaller MA (ed), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 9th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
11. Conville PS, Witebsky FG. 2012. Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Gordonia, Actinomadura, Streptomyces, and other aerobic actinomycetes, p 443–471. In Versalovic J, Carroll KC, Funke G, Jorgensen JH, Landry ML, Warnock DW (ed), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 10th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
12. Garrett MA, Holmes HT, Nolte FS. 1992. Selective buffered charcoal-yeast-extract medium for isolation of nocardiae from mixed cultures. J Clin Microbiol 30:18911892.
13. Murray PR, Heeren RL, Niles AC. 1987. Effect of decontamination procedures on recovery of Nocardia spp. J Clin Microbiol 25:20102011.
14. Murray PR, Niles AC, Heeren RL. 1988. Modified Thayer-Martin medium for recovery of Nocardia species from contaminated specimens. J Clin Microbiol 26:12191220.
15. Roberts GD, Brewer NS, Hermans PE. 1974. Diagnosis of nocardiosis by blood cultures. Mayo Clin Proc 49:293296.

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 6.2–1

Laboratory level I and II qualifying procedures

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Specimen Examination and Primary Isolation, p 6.2.1-6.2.7. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch6.2

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