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Chapter 7.3 : Solid Media Used for Isolation

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Solid Media Used for Isolation, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Both liquid and solid media are recommended for optimal recovery of mycobacteria. Pure cultures of mycobacteria, particularly , are still required, despite molecular technology, to obtain antimicrobial susceptibility test results and for strain subtyping. The advantage of solid media (tubed or in plates) is that they enable the detection of mixed cultures and contaminants. Egg-based and agar-based media may be used. The main advantage of an egg-based medium is that it best supports the growth of and permits niacin testing. However, contamination occurs more easily and can involve the total surface of the medium. The advantages of agar-based media include less contamination and ear lier and easier visibility of colonial morphology. Colonial morphology aids in the identification of mycobacteria. Use of both nonselective and selective media is needed for optimal mycobacterial isolation, the latter containing one or more antimicrobial agents to prevent overgrowth by contaminating bacteria or fungi ( ).

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Solid Media Used for Isolation, p 7.3.1-7.3.4. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch7.3
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References

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1. Atlas RM, Snyder JW. 2011. Reagents, stains, and media: bacteriology, p 272–304. In Versalovic J, Carroll KC, Funke G, Jorgensen JH, Landry ML, Warnock DW (ed), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 10th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
2. Kent PT, Kubica GP. 1985. Public Health Mycobacteriology. A Guide for the Level III Laboratory. US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, Atlanta, GA.
3. Lee LV. 2010. Conventional biochemicals, p 7.3.1–7.3.4. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
4. Pfyffer GE, Palicova F. 2011. Mycobacterium: general characteristics, laboratory detection, and staining procedures, p 472–502. In Versalovic J, Carroll KC, Funke G, Jorgensen JH, Landry ML, Warnock DW (ed), Manual of Clinical Microbiology, 10th ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
5. NCCLS. 2004. Quality Control for Commercially Prepared Microbiological Culture Media. NCCLS document M22-A3, vol. 24, no. 19. NCCLS, Wayne, PA.

Tables

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Table 7.3–1

Media commonly available for recovery of mycobacteria ( )

Citation: Leber A. 2016. Solid Media Used for Isolation, p 7.3.1-7.3.4. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch7.3
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Citation: Leber A. 2016. Solid Media Used for Isolation, p 7.3.1-7.3.4. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch7.3

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