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Chapter 7.5 : I M

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Abstract:

Molecular technologies have largely eliminated the need for the continued use of the conventional biochemicals described below. Importantly, programs directed by the CDC, state, and local governments (Fast Track) have required the referral of specimens and isolates from laboratories for molecular testing. In consideration of those laboratories that do not have access to the newer molecular technologies or referral services, the conventional biochemicals have been reviewed and described below.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. I M, p 7.5.1.1-7.5.2.4. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch7.5
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References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555818814.chap7.5
1. Kent PT, Kubica GP. 1985. Public Health Mycobacteriology. A Guide for the Level III Laboratory. US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, Atlanta, GA.
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3. Lee LV. 2010. Conventional biochemicals, p 7.6.1.1–7.6.1.12. In Garcia L (ed), Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, 3rd ed. ASM Press, Washington, DC.
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Tables

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Table 7.5.1-1

Preparation of arylsulfatase standards ( )

Citation: Leber A. 2016. I M, p 7.5.1.1-7.5.2.4. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch7.5
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Table 7.5.1–2

Distinctive properties of cultivable mycobacteria encountered in clinical specimens

Citation: Leber A. 2016. I M, p 7.5.1.1-7.5.2.4. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch7.5
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Table 7.5.1–3

Features useful for making a presumptive identification of mycobacteria ( )

Citation: Leber A. 2016. I M, p 7.5.1.1-7.5.2.4. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch7.5
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Table 7.5.2-1

Suggested positive and negative control organisms

Citation: Leber A. 2016. I M, p 7.5.1.1-7.5.2.4. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch7.5
Generic image for table
Table 7.5.2-2

Hybridization and selection step temperature ranges and selection times

Citation: Leber A. 2016. I M, p 7.5.1.1-7.5.2.4. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch7.5

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