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Chapter 8.3 : S E

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Abstract:

The microscopic examination of clinical specimens for the presence of fungi plays an important part in the laboratory diagnosis of most mycoses. Microscopic examination may provide a rapid indication of the cause of an infection, allowing the prompt initiation of appropriate antifungal therapy. It is also important to establish whether the fungus is present in the specimen prior to culture because some organisms may also occur as laboratory contaminants. Furthermore, the results of microscopic examination may influence the choice of culture media.

Citation: Leber A. 2016. S E, p 8.3.1.1-8.3.2.8. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch8.3
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Figures

Image of Figure 8.3.1–1
Figure 8.3.1–1

Most common possible fungal etiologies and morphologies seen in specimens (assuming appropriate stain was used to visualize organism [e.g., calcofluor white] or the specimen was left unstained to see pigment).

Citation: Leber A. 2016. S E, p 8.3.1.1-8.3.2.8. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch8.3
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Image of Figure 8.3.1–1
Figure 8.3.1–1

Most common possible fungal etiologies and morphologies seen in specimens (assuming appropriate stain was used to visualize organism [e.g., calcofluor white] or the specimen was left unstained to see pigment).

Citation: Leber A. 2016. S E, p 8.3.1.1-8.3.2.8. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch8.3
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Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 8.3.1–1
Figure 8.3.1–1

Most common possible fungal etiologies and morphologies seen in specimens (assuming appropriate stain was used to visualize organism [e.g., calcofluor white] or the specimen was left unstained to see pigment).

Citation: Leber A. 2016. S E, p 8.3.1.1-8.3.2.8. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch8.3
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Image of Figure 8.3.1–1
Figure 8.3.1–1

Most common possible fungal etiologies and morphologies seen in specimens (assuming appropriate stain was used to visualize organism [e.g., calcofluor white] or the specimen was left unstained to see pigment).

Citation: Leber A. 2016. S E, p 8.3.1.1-8.3.2.8. In Clinical Microbiology Procedures Handbook, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818814.ch8.3
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References

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