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Chapter 3.1.7 : Drinking Water Microbiology

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Drinking Water Microbiology, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

One of the Millennium Development Goals is to halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of the population that does not have sustainable access to safe drinking water, which would increase the coverage from 76% to 88% ( ). This goal was met in 2010, with 116 countries meeting the target ( ). Since 1990, more than two billion people have gained access to improved drinking water sources, with 89% of the population covered. There were only three countries (Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mozambique, and Papua New Guinea) where less than half the population had access to an improved drinking water source, and 35 countries (26 of which are in sub-Saharan Africa) in which only 50–75% of the population has access to an improved source of drinking water. Although this represents a substantial improvement, more than 700 million people still lack access to improved sources of drinking water, almost half of which are in sub-Saharan Africa ( ). It is predicted that there will still be more than half a billion people without access to an improved drinking water supply by 2015.

Citation: Yates M. 2016. Drinking Water Microbiology, p 3.1.7-1-3.1.7-14. In Yates M, Nakatsu C, Miller R, Pillai S (ed), Manual of Environmental Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7
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FIGURE 1

Etiology of 885 drinking water-associated outbreaks, by year—United States, 1971–2012. doi:10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7.f1

Citation: Yates M. 2016. Drinking Water Microbiology, p 3.1.7-1-3.1.7-14. In Yates M, Nakatsu C, Miller R, Pillai S (ed), Manual of Environmental Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7
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FIGURE 2

Reported causes of outbreaks in drinking water in the United States (data from the CDC, excludes ). doi:10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7.f2

Citation: Yates M. 2016. Drinking Water Microbiology, p 3.1.7-1-3.1.7-14. In Yates M, Nakatsu C, Miller R, Pillai S (ed), Manual of Environmental Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7
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Tables

Generic image for table
TABLE 1

Selected pathogens that can be transmitted by water

Citation: Yates M. 2016. Drinking Water Microbiology, p 3.1.7-1-3.1.7-14. In Yates M, Nakatsu C, Miller R, Pillai S (ed), Manual of Environmental Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7
Generic image for table
TABLE 2

Drinking water pathogens regulated by the EPA

Citation: Yates M. 2016. Drinking Water Microbiology, p 3.1.7-1-3.1.7-14. In Yates M, Nakatsu C, Miller R, Pillai S (ed), Manual of Environmental Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7
Generic image for table
TABLE 3

Draft CCL 4 microbial contaminants (February 2015) ( )

Citation: Yates M. 2016. Drinking Water Microbiology, p 3.1.7-1-3.1.7-14. In Yates M, Nakatsu C, Miller R, Pillai S (ed), Manual of Environmental Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7
Generic image for table
TABLE 4

Waterborne pathogens implicated in outbreaks following extreme water-related weather events identified from the scientific literature and ProMED reports ( )

Citation: Yates M. 2016. Drinking Water Microbiology, p 3.1.7-1-3.1.7-14. In Yates M, Nakatsu C, Miller R, Pillai S (ed), Manual of Environmental Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7
Generic image for table
TABLE 5

Selected pathogens with environmental/climatic variables (and factors associated with climate) from the climate change knowledge ( )

Citation: Yates M. 2016. Drinking Water Microbiology, p 3.1.7-1-3.1.7-14. In Yates M, Nakatsu C, Miller R, Pillai S (ed), Manual of Environmental Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7
Generic image for table
TABLE 6

Influence of environment, climate, and weather on cholera ( )

Citation: Yates M. 2016. Drinking Water Microbiology, p 3.1.7-1-3.1.7-14. In Yates M, Nakatsu C, Miller R, Pillai S (ed), Manual of Environmental Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555818821.ch3.1.7

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