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Chapter 29 : Unusual Parasitic Infections

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Abstract:

  • Aquatic protist
  • Protozoa
    • Myxozoan parasites
    • ,
  • Nematodes (the roundworms)
    • spp.
    • spp.
    • ()
  • Cestodes
    • spp.
    • spp.
  • Trematodes
    • spp.
    • sp.
    • ()
    • , , and
    • (North American liver fluke)
    • spp.
  • Pentastomids
    • spp., , and spp.
    • and

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Figures

Image of Figure 29.1
Figure 29.1

Histology of rhinosporidiosis; human nasal polyp. (Top) Immature trophocytes; note the thick walls and the surrounding inflammatory cells (from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). (Middle) Sporangium containing endospores (from , with permission). (Bottom) Rhinosporidiosis of the conjunctiva (courtesy of Doctorfungus Corporation, J. Moses, 2000). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f1

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.2
Figure 29.2

Morphologic differences between cytoplasmic fragments of ciliated bronchial cells (arrow) (top) and the flagellate protozoon (bottom) in stained sputum smears. (Courtesy of Rafael Martinez-Giron, Fundacion INCLINICA, Spain; cover image from , Nov. 2013, volume 62; reference 4.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f2

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.3
Figure 29.3

. (Upper, left) Spherical double wall cysts from culture (Gram stain); (right) corneal button showing cysts (arrow), hematoxylin and eosin stain. (Lower) Cornea of eye showing ring-shaped central infiltrate and central thinning (very similar to that seen with infections) (courtesy of , with permission.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f3

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.4
Figure 29.4

(A) Normal human spermatozoa. (B) Myxosporean spore from salmon. Note the similarities between panels A and B. (C and D) Two spores demonstrating the polar filaments. (Reprinted from with permission.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f4

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.5
Figure 29.5

(Upper) in a peripheral blood film. (Lower) in a blood smear. (From , with permission, images courtesy of Marc Desquesnes.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f5

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.6
Figure 29.6

. (A) Threadlike worms at the terminal ileum. (B) By magnifying endoscopy, hookworm is seen hooking its head into the intestinal mucosa and engulfing blood. (C) Characteristic hookworm mouthparts. (Courtesy of , with permission.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f6

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.7
Figure 29.7

Longitudinal section through the rhabditiform esophagus in the anterior end of a mature female (renamed ) worm in the brain. The procorpus (pc), metacarpus (mc), isthmus (is), bulb (bu), and intestine (in) are indicated (×1,040). (Armed Forces Institute of Pathology photograph; published in 125, 1975.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f7

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.8
Figure 29.8

Life cycle of spp. doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f8

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.9
Figure 29.9

(Upper) Anterior end of an adult worm recovered from human feces. Note the cephalic groove, characteristic of the genus (×115). (Reprinted from Merial U.S./animal health company, cited as original source from http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/projects/merial/Strongls/strong_6.htm.) (Lower) egg; this egg cannot be differentiated from that of hookworm (courtesy of the CDC Public Health Image Library). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f9

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.10
Figure 29.10

Scanning electron micrograph of the cephalic end of a female worm recovered from human feces. Note the inner and outer leaf crowns with 12 and 24 (sometimes 10 and 20) lips, respectively, and the papillae (×630). (Photograph by the Department of Electron Microscopy, Medical Faculty, Leiden University; reprinted from with permission.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f10

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.11
Figure 29.11

Nodular lesion of oesophagostomiasis seen as a paraumbilical mass in an otherwise healthy 5-year-old girl in Nigeria. At laparotomy, the lesion was found to have arisen in the ascending colon and was adherent to the muscles and fascia of the anterior abdominal wall (×11). (Armed Forces Institute of Pathology photograph.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f11

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.12
Figure 29.12

Surgically resected nodule of oesophagostomiasis. Note the worm protruding into the cavity. Specific identification of these worms is difficult, because intact specimens are rarely obtained. (Armed Forces Institute of Pathology photograph.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f12

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.13
Figure 29.13

nematode larvae in raw fish (from : a cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f13

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.14
Figure 29.14

(Upper) Adult female grasshopper nematode, , climbing vegetation in preparation for depositing eggs. (Lower) Juvenile grasshopper nematode, , that has descended into the soil after exiting a grasshopper (courtesy of University of Florida, photograph by John Capinera: http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/beneficial/misc/mermis_nigrescens.htm). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f14

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.15
Figure 29.15

(1) Head of removed from the mouth of an infant. Note the mouth opening (arrow), lip papilla (L), and cephalic papillae (C). Bar, 80 μm. (2) Eggs of inside the uterus of the specimen. Note the thick, double-walled shell surrounding the fully developed embryos. Arrows point to poles containing collapsed byssi. Bar, 55 μm. (Reprinted from with permission.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f15

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.16
Figure 29.16

eggs. These eggs measures 60 to 80 μm by 39 to 46 μm and have a thick shell that appears wrinkled; the ends of the egg are usually lighter in color (see egg on the left). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f16

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.17
Figure 29.17

in human tissue; cross sections of larvae of in a subcutaneous nodule (courtesy of the CDC Public Health Image Library). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f17

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.18
Figure 29.18

Liesegang rings. (Upper) Liesegang-like rings in slightly dilated breast ducts associated with lactational change (hematoxylin and eosin; original magnification, ×10). (Lower) Higher magnification of Liesegang-like rings and lactational change (hematoxylin and eosin; original magnification, ×40). (Courtesy of ; National Institutes of Health.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f18

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.19
Figure 29.19

Liesegang rings in the wall of a hemorrhagic renal cyst (arrows) (hematoxylin and eosin, ×200) (From : a cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f19

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.20
Figure 29.20

egg. This egg measures 85 by 50 μm and closely resembles the egg of hookworm and ; however, it is larger. (Left) Drawing; (right) iodine preparation direct mount. doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f20

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.21
Figure 29.21

(). (Upper) “Y” configuration. (Lower) Worms in the trachea of a turkey; note the typical “Y” configuration of the adult male and female worms. (From : a cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f21

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.22
Figure 29.22

eggs. This egg measures 78 to 95 μm by 42 to 54 μm. (Left) drawing; (right) iodine preparation direct mount. doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f22

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.23
Figure 29.23

. (A) Anterior end of the worm (adapted from Ward HB, , 1916). (B) Posterior end of the worm (adapted from ). (C) Egg (adapted from ). (Far right) Anterior end of the worm. doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f23

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.24
Figure 29.24

tapeworm proglottids. Note the width of the proglottids and their very short length; also note the two genital organs in each proglottid. doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f24

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.25
Figure 29.25

egg. This egg measures 63 to 68 μm by 50 μm; note the resemblance to the egg. (Left) Drawing; (right) methylene blue preparation direct mount. doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f25

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.26
Figure 29.26

. (Top) Egg; note the pyriform apparatus (arrow) and hooklets (oval). (Middle) Scolex. (Bottom) Proglottids. (Courtesy of the CDC Public Health Image Library). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f26

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.27
Figure 29.27

. (Top) Scolex (two views). (Middle, left to right) Egg capsule, strobila, single egg containing a hexacanth larva. (Bottom, left to right) Mature proglottid, young gravid proglottid, gravid proglottid containing egg packets. (Adapted from Kouri P, 179–181, 1940; appeared on page 507 of ). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f27

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.28
Figure 29.28

. (Left) Scolex; (middle) mature proglottid; (right) gravid proglottid containing egg packets. doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f28

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.29
Figure 29.29

spp. Tetrathyridium larva contained in meat from animal that serves as the intermediate host and which is ingested by the human. (Courtesy of the CDC Public Health Image Library.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f29

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.30
Figure 29.30

spp. (Top) Scolex; two of the suckers are visible with no rostellar hooklets. (Middle) Mature proglottid. CS, cirrus sac; OV, bilobed ovary; TE, numerous testes; VA, vagina. (Bottom) Gravid proglottid. ED, excretory ducts; UT, uterus. (All stained with carmine; courtesy of the CDC Public Health Image Library.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f30

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.31
Figure 29.31

. Retinal photograph showing budding cysticercus . (From : a cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman; photograph courtesy of Renio Freeman.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f31

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.32
Figure 29.32

cysticercus after surgical removal from the eye. (From : a cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman; photograph courtesy of Renio Freeman.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f32

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.33
Figure 29.33

. (Left) View of the base of the left index finger of the patient during surgery. Numerous fish spawn- or roe-like cysts were found, measuring approximately 3 mm in diameter. At the right upper quadrant a surgical cut in the back of the hand is visible, where further cysticerci were removed. (Right) T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging tomography of the left forearm. Bright white areas correspond to parasitic infiltration (arrows). (Courtesy of .) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f33

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.34
Figure 29.34

. Living mesocercaria removed from a human liver at autopsy. (From : a cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman; photograph courtesy of R. S. Freeman.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f34

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.35
Figure 29.35

. (Top left) Mesocercaria in the patient's pons; (Top right) Mesocercaria in lung; (Lower) Magnified image from lung. (From A Pictorial Presentation of Parasites: A cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman. Photograph courtesy of R. S. Freeman.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f35

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.36
Figure 29.36

. Freely moving mesocercaria on the retina of the human eye (arrow). (From : a cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman; photograph courtesy of R. S. Freeman.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f36

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.37
Figure 29.37

spp. (Left) Adult fluke. (Right) Eggs that resemble those of and . (From , with permission.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f37

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.38
Figure 29.38

. (Left) Adult fluke. (Right) Eggs that somewhat resemble those of , but can be differentiated on the basis of size. (From the Korean Society for Parasitology Web Atlas of Medical Parasitology, http://atlas.or.kr/index.html.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f38

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.39
Figure 29.39

. (Upper) Egg; these eggs measure 26 to 32 μm long and 16 to 17.5 μm wide. (Lower) Electron microscopy: (A) Adult trematode (B) has two suckers and a spiny coat and (C) releases sperm from a genital pore. Scale bar, 0.5 mm. (Lower panels from , with permission.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f39

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.40
Figure 29.40

. (Left) Adult fluke, which is quite small and measures 0.8 to 1.1 mm long by 0.3 to 0.5 mm wide. (Right) Egg, which is broadly oval, operculated, thick-shelled, and yellow and measures 60 to 80 μm long by 34 to 50 μm wide. (Courtesy of the CDC Public Health Image Library.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f40

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.41
Figure 29.41

. (Left) Adult fluke (courtesy of the CDC Public Health Image Library). (Right) Eggs, SEM view; these eggs measure 26 to 27 μm long and 12 to 13 μm wide with a narrow/small operculum (from , with permission). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f41

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.42
Figure 29.42

isolated from a patient. (1) Ventral view of the holotype. (2) Ventral view of the structure of the terminal portion of the reproductive system. c, cirrus; cs, cirrus sac; gp, genital pore; mt, metraterm; os, oral sucker; pg, prostate gland, sv, seminal vesicle. (Reprinted from with permission.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f42

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.43
Figure 29.43

. (Left) Adult fluke, (Right) Eggs, which are quite small and measure 23 to 33 μm long by 12 to 18 μm wide. (Courtesy of Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, http://www.cai.md.chula.ac.th/lesson/test/5403/html/04morp.html.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f43

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.44
Figure 29.44

. (Left) Adult fluke. (Right) Egg, which measures 28 by 14 μm. (Courtesy of the CDC Public Health Image Library.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f44

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.45
Figure 29.45

(Left) Adult fluke, which measures 0.4 to 0.5 mm by 0.2 to 0.3 mm—the smallest of all human trematodes reported in the Republic of Korea (courtesy of the CDC Public Health Image Library). (Right) Egg, which measures from 20 to 25 μm to 11 to 15 μm (from , with permission). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f45

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.46
Figure 29.46

(Left) Adult fluke (courtesy of University of Sydney, Centre for Veterinary Education, http://vetbook.org/wiki/dog/index.php/Metorchis_spp). (Right) Egg with very similar morphology to many of the other small trematodes (courtesy of McGill University/Canada, on Stanford's site, http://www.stanford.edu/group/parasites/ParaSites2006/Metorchiasis/diagnostics_management&therapy.html). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f46

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.47
Figure 29.47

. Image of egg (very similar to ). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f47

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.48
Figure 29.48

Adult trematode. OS, oral sucker; MC, muscular cirrus; VS, ventral sucker; DVCD, distal vitellaria collecting duct; Ut, uterus; Ov, ovary; AT, anterior testis; PT, posterior testis. (Courtesy of Pinto RM et al, 579–583, 2005.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f48

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.49
Figure 29.49

Life cycle of the tongue worms (pentastomids) and spp. (1) Humans ingest raw or inadequately cooked snake or lizard; (2) humans ingest eggs on vegetation or in water; (3) humans ingest the flesh of intermediate hosts containing infective larvae. doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f49

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.50
Figure 29.50

(Left) Nonencysted mature larva attached to the abdominal surface of a human diaphragm (magnification, ×4). (Right) Encysted larva on the surface of the liver of a 55-year-old Zairian. The cyst contains a C-shaped larva (magnification, ×12). (Armed Forces Institute of Pathology photographs.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f50

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.51
Figure 29.51

(Left) Worm-like adults of sp. in the trachea of a snake. (Right) Pentastome larva with marked external annulations. (Courtesy of the Natural History Collection, The University of Edinburgh, http://www.nhc.ed.ac.uk/index.php?page=24.25.333.374.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f51

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.52
Figure 29.52

Life cycle of the acanthocephalans (thorny-headed worms). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f52

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.53
Figure 29.53

(Left) Thorny-headed worm. Note the proboscis, which is covered with spines. (Illustration by Sharon Belkin.) (Right) Close-up image of the anterior end of the worm and the proboscis containing hooks (courtesy of the CDC Public Health Image Library). doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f53

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.54
Figure 29.54

, complete adult specimen, approximately 133 mm long (magnification, ×5) (Armed Forces Institute of Pathology photograph.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f54

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.55
Figure 29.55

proboscis attached to pig bowel wall. The insertion of the toothed proboscis, along with the inflammation, ulceration, and hemorrhage caused, is seen in this low-power view. (From : a cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f55

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.56
Figure 29.56

eggs. These eggs measure 80 to 100 μm by 50 μm, have a thick, dark brown, textured shell, and contain a developed acanthor larva with hooks. (From : a cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f56

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Image of Figure 29.57
Figure 29.57

eggs. These eggs measure 90 to 125 μm by 65 μm and contain a fully developed acanthor larva with visible hooks. (From : a cooperative collection prepared and/or edited by H. Zaiman.) doi:10.1128/9781555819002.ch29.f57

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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Tables

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TABLE 29.1

Unusual parasitic infections

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29
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TABLE 29.2

Human parasites acquired from the ingestion of raw or poorly cooked fish

Citation: Garcia L. 2016. Unusual Parasitic Infections, p 845-882. In Diagnostic Medical Parasitology, Sixth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819002.ch29

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