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Chapter 15 : Paleopathology and Paleomicrobiology of Malaria

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Paleopathology and Paleomicrobiology of Malaria, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Malaria, one of the deadliest diseases of humankind, remains a major global health problem in the 21st century ( ). In 2014, 198 million persons were infected, with more than 0.5 million deaths from malaria globally. Malaria is recognized as the second leading cause of death from infectious diseases in Africa, after HIV/AIDS, and is the fifth most frequent cause of death from infectious diseases worldwide, after respiratory infections, HIV/AIDS, diarrheal diseases, and tuberculosis ( ).

Citation: Nerlich A. 2016. Paleopathology and Paleomicrobiology of Malaria, p 155-160. In Drancourt M, Raoult D (ed), Paleomicrobiology of Humans. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.PoH-0006-2015
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Figures

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Figure 1

Temple wall representation of an insect (Temple of Queen Hatchepsut, Deir-el-Bahari, Thebes-West, Egypt, c. 1300 BC). Most Egyptological references translate this hieroglyph as “bee”; however, there is also some potential resemblance to anopheles flies.

Citation: Nerlich A. 2016. Paleopathology and Paleomicrobiology of Malaria, p 155-160. In Drancourt M, Raoult D (ed), Paleomicrobiology of Humans. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.PoH-0006-2015
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Macropathological example of severe chronic anemia evidenced by orbital pitting (cribra orbitalia). Similar morphological changes may occur in chronic anemia caused by malaria. However, cribra orbitalia and other porotic hyperostoses of the skull are also seen in chronic deficiency conditions, including anemia with other causes.

Citation: Nerlich A. 2016. Paleopathology and Paleomicrobiology of Malaria, p 155-160. In Drancourt M, Raoult D (ed), Paleomicrobiology of Humans. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/microbiolspec.PoH-0006-2015
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References

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