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Section 1 : Communicating Laboratory Needs

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Abstract:

is more important to the effectiveness of a laboratory than a specimen that has been appropriately selected, collected, and transported.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Figures

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Figure 2

The laboratory can provide clinically significant information when skilled workers follow approved guidelines for culture workup. The laboratorian, however, must have rapid access to pertinent patient information.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Figure 3

Laboratory design and layout are important aspects in promoting efficient workflows that lead to improved services provided by the microbiology section.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Figure 4

Aspirated specimens may be transported and submitted in the syringe, as long as the needle is removed prior to sending to the lab.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Figure 5

Upon receipt in the laboratory, specimens are checked for proper labeling with protected health information and anatomical source information. Valuable time is lost when laboratory personnel have to follow up on specimens that are improperly labeled.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Figure 6

Flocked swabs from commercial sources provide recommended transport containers and instructions that protect the specimen and its organisms from degradation. A variety of swabs are available for bacterial, viral, and other collections.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Figure 7

Sterile cups with screw-cap lids can be used to transport a variety of specimens.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Figure 8

The physician may need some clinically relevant information within 30 min to 1 h of specimen arrival. Final reports may require 24 to 72 h for completion.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Figure 9

Packaging and shipping. Image courtesy of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/pdf/ebola-lab-guidance.pdf.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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References

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Tables

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Table 1

Transport concepts and solutions

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Table 2

Specimen sources likely to be contaminated

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Table 3

Commonly used swab types in specimen collection

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Table 4

Storage conditions for various transport systems and suspected agents

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Table 5

Color codes for vacuum tubes

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Untitled

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
Generic image for table
Untitled

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
Generic image for table
Table 6

Specimen priority for processing

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Table 7

Criteria for rejection of a specimen

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Table 8

Specimens to be discouraged because of questionable microbial information

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1
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Table 9

Suitability of various clinical materials for anaerobic culture

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Communicating Laboratory Needs, p 1-40. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch1

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