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Section 2 : Specimen Management Policies and Rationale

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Specimen Management Policies and Rationale, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

In cooperation with selected members of the medical staff or laboratory clients, the laboratory should formulate a policy for specimen management that supports both good medicine and good laboratory practice. This policy should be documented, and a copy of it should be distributed to all users and clients of microbiology laboratory services. Part of the policy should be a carefully prepared, fact-supported manual on how to collect and handle specimens. It is important for nurses and clinicians to understand the needs of the laboratory regarding specimen collection and handling. In addition, the policy should address the special needs of the laboratory and the rationale for these needs. Laboratory leaders should be prepared to provide in-service training on specimen collection and management policies to medical and nursing staff and others who collect specimens for microbiology. This section discusses simple policy statements and includes the rationale for each policy in italics.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Management Policies and Rationale, p 41-64. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch2
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Figures

Image of Figure 10
Figure 10

Specimens for anaerobic culture require transport containers and conditions that protect the strictest anaerobes from exposure to oxygen. Many are available commercially for transport of swabs, tissues, and fluids, and manufacturer instructions should be followed where available.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Management Policies and Rationale, p 41-64. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch2
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Image of Figure 11
Figure 11

The class II biological safety cabinet (BSC) is used in several areas in the laboratory. Here, the BSC is the required site for specimen opening and inoculation, and initial manipulations. Other BSCs will be used in the mycology and virology laboratory as well as for manipulation of specimens.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Management Policies and Rationale, p 41-64. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch2
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Image of Figure 12
Figure 12

Designated areas, such as a dead air box seen here, are recommended when preparing reagents and reaction mixtures for molecular testing.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Management Policies and Rationale, p 41-64. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch2
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Image of Figure 13a
Figure 13a

Vaginal swabs invariably contain large numbers of normal flora, as indicated by the presence of large numbers of epithelial cells seen first at low power (A) and then under oil immersion (B). Interpretation is difficult.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Management Policies and Rationale, p 41-64. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch2
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Image of Figure 13b
Figure 13b

Vaginal swabs invariably contain large numbers of normal flora, as indicated by the presence of large numbers of epithelial cells seen first at low power (A) and then under oil immersion (B). Interpretation is difficult.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Management Policies and Rationale, p 41-64. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch2
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References

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