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Section 3 : Specimen Collection and Processing

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Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Figures

Image of Figure 14
Figure 14

Drawing of an Entero-Test capsule. In comparison with intubation, this capsule allows a less invasive examination of duodenum contents for parasitic infection.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Figure 15

Diagram of the stomach, showing the antral region.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 16
Figure 16

Plastic collection device for obtaining specimen for pinworm analysis.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 17
Figure 17

Alternative method for pinworm collection when a paddle device is unavailable. Adapted from reference (39).

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 18
Figure 18

Disposable sanitary device for collection of stool specimens. Oral and written directions for specimen timing, preservation, and transport to the laboratory should be provided to the patient.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 19
Figure 19

For parasitology studies, patients must be given one or two special transport vials and directions for their use.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 20
Figure 20

Illustrated instructions on how to use the parasitology transport and preservative vial(s) may be helpful to patients. A non-mercury-containing fixative may be used in place of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Adapted from reference (39).

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 21
Figure 21

Specimen quality is judged microscopically. The presence of epithelial cells usually signals the presence of commensal flora that can confuse accurate interpretation.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 22
Figure 22

A Lukens trap is used for collecting many respiratory aspirates.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 23
Figure 23

Nasopharyngeal specimens are often collected inadequately. To reach the nasopharynx, the swab should be inserted approximately half the distance from the base of the nose to the ear.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 24
Figure 24

Diagram of the nose and nasopharyngeal region. While nasal and nasopharyngeal specimens may be obtained by swab, a needle aspirate is the specimen of choice for determining the etiologic agent(s) of sinusitis.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 25
Figure 25

Sterile, prepackaged sputum collection containers are provided to patients along with oral and written instructions on how to collect an appropriate specimen. In this system, sputum is collected in the funnel-shaped device. The tube that contains the specimen is removed, and the cap is firmly applied.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 26
Figure 26

Proper technique for obtaining throat specimens. Firmly sampling only the inflamed areas of the throat and tonsils and avoiding other oral sites will enhance detection of etiologic agents.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 27a
Figure 27a

Sterile, prepackaged urine collection cups are made available to patients, along with oral and written instructions (A). Urine can then be transffered to a special transport tube with preservatives (B); this step is usually performed by the health care personnel.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 27b
Figure 27b

Sterile, prepackaged urine collection cups are made available to patients, along with oral and written instructions (A). Urine can then be transffered to a special transport tube with preservatives (B); this step is usually performed by the health care personnel.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 28
Figure 28

Wound specimens should, at the least, be labeled as “surface wound” or “deep wound.” The laboratory depends on this information for selecting appropriate culture media and interpreting results.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 29
Figure 29

Diagram of the ear. A swab is not the specimen of choice for laboratory diagnosis of otitis media because it obviously will not reach the infected area. Preparing the ear for specimen collection is a critical step in obtaining an appropriate specimen.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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Image of Figure 30
Figure 30

Diagram of the eye. The nature and potential severity of infections of the eye dictate special attention to the details of specimen management and an accurate description of the specimen submitted for analysis.

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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References

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Tables

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10

Specimen management of sterile body fluids

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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11

Conditions and protocols for collecting blood specimens

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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12

Characteristics of preservatives used to transport feces for parasite examination

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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13

Genital specimens for culture

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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14

Agents of genital infection in women

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
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15

Specimens and collection methods for testing

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
Generic image for table
16

Specimens and collection methods for viral testing

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3
Generic image for table
17

Methods of collecting specimens from the eye

Citation: Miller J, Miller S. 2017. Specimen Collection and Processing, p 65-152. In A Guide to Specimen Management in Clinical Microbiology, Third Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819620.ch3

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