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Chapter 13 : Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted by the Airborne Route

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Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted by the Airborne Route, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

For some pathogenic microorganisms, the airborne route is the predominant means of transmission to humans. These agents, which may be transmitted from humans, animals, and the environment, i.e., soil and water, include certain pathogenic viruses, bacteria, and fungi. Although certain species of fungi and mycobacteria share the airborne route of transmission, they are very different in substantive elements of transmission, including their natural habitats and reservoirs. It is only with a clear knowledge of these differences that the laboratorian can adequately perform a risk assessment and implement appropriate safety protocols to abate those hazards in the laboratory.

Citation: Pentella M. 2017. Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted by the Airborne Route, p 285-297. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch13
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References

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Tables

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Table 1.

Citation: Pentella M. 2017. Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted by the Airborne Route, p 285-297. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch13
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Citation: Pentella M. 2017. Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted by the Airborne Route, p 285-297. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch13
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Citation: Pentella M. 2017. Biosafety for Microorganisms Transmitted by the Airborne Route, p 285-297. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch13

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