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Chapter 17 : Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards

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Abstract:

Primary barriers are both techniques and equipment that guard against the release of biological material; they may also be referred to as primary containment. In general, they provide a physical barrier between the worker and/or the environment and the hazardous material. Primary barriers range from a basic laboratory coat to a biological safety cabinet (BSC). This chapter addresses some of the more common primary containment devices and personal protective equipment (PPE) and a variety of equipment-associated hazards. Other chapters cover respiratory protection, work practices, and BSCs that are more specific examples of primary containment.

Citation: Duane E, Fink R. 2017. Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards, p 367-374. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch17
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Figures

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Figure 1

Super Mouse 750 Micro-Isolator (92140AR) high-density animal housing system equipped with EnviroGard environmental control supply and exhaust air units. (Courtesy of Lab Products, Inc.)

Citation: Duane E, Fink R. 2017. Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards, p 367-374. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch17
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Figure 2

Ultracentrifuge rotor after the rotor exploded. (Courtesy of MIT Biosafety Office.)

Citation: Duane E, Fink R. 2017. Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards, p 367-374. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch17
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Image of Figure 3
Figure 3

Pieces of an ultracentrifuge rotor after the rotor exploded. (Courtesy of MIT Biosafety Office.)

Citation: Duane E, Fink R. 2017. Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards, p 367-374. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch17
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References

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Tables

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Table 1.

Citation: Duane E, Fink R. 2017. Primary Barriers and Equipment-Associated Hazards, p 367-374. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch17

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