1887

Chapter 19 : Arthropod Vector Biocontainment

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Ebook: Choose a downloadable PDF or ePub file. Chapter is a downloadable PDF file. File must be downloaded within 48 hours of purchase

Buy this Chapter
Digital (?) $30.00

Preview this chapter:
Zoom in
Zoomout

Arthropod Vector Biocontainment, Page 1 of 2

| /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555819637/9781555816209.ch19-1.gif /docserver/preview/fulltext/10.1128/9781555819637/9781555816209.ch19-2.gif

Abstract:

The recent emergence and reemergence of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) such as chikungunya and Zika viruses, which are transmitted by mosquitoes, highlights the need to increase the capacity to conduct research on these pathogens and the vectors that are involved in the transmission cycles. Over the past two decades, the United States has had several arboviruses introduced, highlighting the need for more facilities and researchers to study these viruses. The introduction of West Nile virus (WNV) into the United States in 1999 (1–4) revealed a lack of suitably trained entomologists/virologists who could conduct critical surveillance operations and fieldwork essential for effective targeting of vector control programs. It also highlighted the erosion of training and educational material for entomology related to public health (5). Following the introduction of WNV, the capacity for surveillance and research increased in some areas; however, there is a need to continue support for these programs to quickly control new introductions of diseases transmitted by arthropods.

Citation: Vanlandingham D, Higgs S, Huang Y. 2017. Arthropod Vector Biocontainment, p 399-410. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch19
Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

Figures

Image of Figure 1
Figure 1

Example of ACL2 insectary layout. Modified with permission from Duthu et al. ( ).

Citation: Vanlandingham D, Higgs S, Huang Y. 2017. Arthropod Vector Biocontainment, p 399-410. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch19
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Example of ACL3 insectary layout. Modified with permission from Duthu et al. ( ).

Citation: Vanlandingham D, Higgs S, Huang Y. 2017. Arthropod Vector Biocontainment, p 399-410. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch19
Permissions and Reprints Request Permissions
Download as Powerpoint

References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555819637.ch19
1. Campbell GL, Marfin AA, Lanciotti RS, Gubler DJ. 2002. West Nile virus. Lancet Infect Dis 2:519529.[CrossRef][PubMed]
2. Granwehr BP, Lillibridge KM, Higgs S, Mason PW, Aronson JF, Campbell GA, Barrett ADT. 2004. West Nile virus: where are we now? Lancet Infect Dis 4:547556.[CrossRef][PubMed]
3. Nash D, Mostashari F, Fine A, Miller J, O'Leary D, Murray K, Huang A, Rosenberg A, Greenberg A, Sherman M, Wong S, Campbell GL, Roehrig JT, Gubler DJ, Shieh W-J, Zaki S, Smith P, Layton M, for the West Nile Outbreak Response Working G 1999 West Nile Outbreak Response Working Group. 2001. The outbreak of West Nile virus infection in the New York City area in 1999. N Engl J Med 344:18071814.[CrossRef][PubMed]
4. O'Leary DR, Marfin AA, Montgomery SP, Kipp AM, Lehman JA, Biggerstaff BJ, Elko VL, Collins PD, Jones JE, Campbell GL. 2004. The epidemic of West Nile virus in the United States, 2002. Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 4:6170.[CrossRef][PubMed]
5. Spielman A, Pollack RJ, Kiszewski AE, Telford SR III. 2001. Issues in public health entomology. Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 1:319.[CrossRef][PubMed]
6. Duffy MR, Chen TH, Hancock WT, Powers AM, Kool JL, Lanciotti RS, Pretrick M, Marfel M, Holzbauer S, Dubray C, Guillaumot L, Griggs A, Bel M, Lambert AJ, Laven J, Kosoy O, Panella A, Biggerstaff BJ, Fischer M, Hayes EB. 2009. Zika virus outbreak on Yap Island, Federated States of Micronesia. N Engl J Med 360:25362543.[CrossRef][PubMed]
7. Musso D, Nilles EJ, Cao-Lormeau VM. 2014. Rapid spread of emerging Zika virus in the Pacific area. Clin Microbiol Infect 20: O595O596.
8. Bogoch II, Brady OJ, Kraemer MU, German M, Creatore MI, Kulkarni MA, Brownstein JS, Mekaru SR, Hay SI, Groot E, Watts A, Khan K. 2016. Anticipating the international spread of Zika virus from Brazil. Lancet 387:335336.[CrossRef][PubMed]
9. Hubálek Z, Halouzka J. 1999. West Nile fever—a reemerging mosquito-borne viral disease in Europe. Emerg Infect Dis 5: 643650.[PubMed]
10. Benedict MQ, Levine RS, Hawley WA, Lounibos LP. 2007. Spread of the tiger: global risk of invasion by the mosquito Aedes albopictus. Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 7:7685.[CrossRef][PubMed]
11. Vanlandingham DL, Higgs S, Huang YS. 2016. Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and mosquito-borne viruses in the United States. J Med Entomol 2016:tjw025.[CrossRef][PubMed]
12. Tsetsarkin KA, Vanlandingham DL, McGee CE, Higgs S. 2007. A single mutation in chikungunya virus affects vector specificity and epidemic potential. PLoS Pathog 3:e201[CrossRef].[PubMed]
13. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health. 2009. Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 5th ed. HHS Publication no. (CDC) 21-112. http://www.cdc.gov/biosafety/publications/bmbl5/BMBL.pdf.
14. Richmond JY. 1997. Designing a Modern Microbiological/Biomedical Laboratory. American Public Health Association, Washington, DC.
15. Marquardt WC, Black WC, Freier JE, Hagedorn H, Moore C, Hemingway J, Higgs S, James A, Kondratieff B (ed). 2004. Biology of Disease Vectors, 2nd ed. Elsevier Academic Press.
16. Bouchard KR, Wikel SK,. 2004. Care, maintenance, and experimental infestation of ticks in the laboratory setting, p 705711. In Marquardt WC, Kondratieff B, Moore CG, Freier J, Hagedorn HH, Black W III, James AA, Hemingway J, Higgs S (ed), Biology of Disease Vectors, 2nd ed. Elsevier Academic Press.
17. Benedict MQ, Tabachnick WJ, Higgs S American Committee of Medical Entomology American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2003. Arthropod containment guidelines. A project of the American Committee of Medical Entomology and American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 3:6198.[PubMed]
18. The Subcommittee on Arbovirus Laboratory Safety of the American Committee on Arthropod-Borne Viruses. 1980. Laboratory safety for arboviruses and certain other viruses of vertebrates. Am J Trop Med Hyg 29:13591381.[PubMed]
19. Duthu DB, Higgs S, Beets RL Jr, McGlade TJ,. 2001. Design issues for insectaries, p 227244. In Richmond JY (ed), Anthology of Biosafety IV: Issues in Public Health. American Biological Safety Association, Mundelein, IL.
20. Higgs S, Benedict MQ, Tabachnick WJ,. 2003. Arthropod containment guidelines, p 7384. In Richmond JY (ed), Anthology of Biosafety: VI Arthropod Borne Diseases. American Biological Safety Association, Mundelein, IL.
21. Crane J, Mottet M,. 2004. BSL-3 Insectary Facilities, p 2934. In Richmond JY (ed), Anthology of Biosafety VII: Biosafety Level 3. American Biological Safety Association, Mundelein, IL.
22. Olson K, Larson RE, Ellis RP,. 2003. Biosafety issues and solutions for working with infected mosquitoes, p. 2538. In Richmond JY (ed), Anthology of Biosafety VI: Arthropod Borne Diseases. American Biological Safety Association. Mundelein, IL.
23. Hunt GJ, Schmidtmann ET,. 2003. Safe and secure handling of virus-exposed biting midges within a BSL-3-AG containment facility, p 8598. In Richmond JY (ed), Anthology of Biosafety VI: Arthropod Borne Diseases. American Biological Safety Association, Mundelein, IL.
24. Drolet B, Campbell C, Mecham J,. 2003. Protect yourself and your sample: processing arbovirus-infected biting midges for viral detection assays and differential expression studies, p. 5362. In Richmond JY (ed), Anthology of Biosafety VI: Arthropod Borne Diseases. American Biological Safety Association, Mundelein, IL.
25. Achee NL, Youngblood L, Bangs MJ, Lavery JV, James S. 2015. Considerations for the use of human participants in vector biology research: a tool for investigators and regulators. Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 15:89102.[CrossRef][PubMed]
26. Department of Health and Human Services. 2009. CFR 45 Public welfare, Part 46: Protection of human subjects. Washington, DC. http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/regulations-and-policy/regulations/45-cfr-46.
27. Alphey L, Benedict M, Bellini R, Clark GG, Dame DA, Service MW, Dobson SL. 2010. Sterile-insect methods for control of mosquito-borne diseases: an analysis. Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis 10:295311.[CrossRef][PubMed]
28. Higgs S. 2013. Alternative approaches to control dengue and chikungunya: transgenic mosquitoes. Public Health 24:3542.
29. Barrangou R, Fremaux C, Deveau H, Richards M, Boyaval P, Moineau S, Romero DA, Horvath P. 2007. CRISPR provides acquired resistance against viruses in prokaryotes. Science 315: 17091712.[CrossRef][PubMed]
30. Hale CR, Zhao P, Olson S, Duff MO, Graveley BR, Wells L, Terns RM, Terns MP. 2009. RNA-guided RNA cleavage by a CRISPR RNA-Cas protein complex. Cell 139:945956.[CrossRef][PubMed]
31. Sternberg SH, Doudna JA. 2015. Expanding the biologist's toolkit with CRISPR-Cas9. Mol Cell 58:568574.[CrossRef][PubMed]
32. Gantz VM, Jasinskiene N, Tatarenkova O, Fazekas A, Macias VM, Bier E, James AA. 2015. Highly efficient Cas9-mediated gene drive for population modification of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles stephensi. Proc Natl Acad Sci 112:E6736E6743.
33. Hammond A, Galizi R, Kyrou K, Simoni A, Siniscalchi C, Katsanos D, Gribble M, Baker D, Marois E, Russell S, Burt A, Windbichler N, Crisanti A, Nolan T. 2016. A CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive system targeting female reproduction in the malaria mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae. Nat Biotechnol 34:7883.[CrossRef][PubMed]
34. Committee on Gene Drive Research in Non-Human Organisms: Recommendations for Responsible Conduct; Board on Life Sciences; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Gene Drives on the Horizon: Advancing Science, Navigating Uncertainty, and Aligning Research with Public Values. National Academies Press, Washington, DC.
35. Akbari OS, Bellen HJ, Bier E, Bullock SL, Burt A, Church GM, Cook KR, Duchek P, Edwards OR, Esvelt KM, Gantz VM, Golic KG, Gratz SJ, Harrison MM, Hayes KR, James AA, Kaufman TC, Knoblich J, Malik HS, Matthews KA, O'Connor-Giles KM, Parks AL, Perrimon N, Port F, Russell S, Ueda R, Wildonger J. 2015. Safeguarding gene drive experiments in the laboratory. Science 349:927929.[CrossRef][PubMed]
36. Office of Science Policy, National Institutes of Health. 2016. NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules (NIH Guidelines). http://osp.od.nih.gov/office-biotechnology-activities/biosafety/nih-guidelines.
37. Higgs S, Olson KE, Kamrud KI, Powers AM, Beaty BJ,. 1997. Viral expression systems and viral infections in insects, p 459483. In Crampton JM, Beard CB, Louis C (ed), The Molecular Biology of Disease Vectors: A Methods Manual. Chapman and Hall, UK.[CrossRef]

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1.

Citation: Vanlandingham D, Higgs S, Huang Y. 2017. Arthropod Vector Biocontainment, p 399-410. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch19

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error