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Chapter 2 : Indigenous Zoonotic Agents of Research Animals

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Abstract:

Laboratory animals have played a major role in advancing biomedical research and will continue to be important for identifying fundamental mechanisms of disease and exploring the efficacy and safety of novel therapies. The health status of these animals can have a direct impact on the validity and value of the research results, as well as on the health and safety of those who work with them. Husbandry practices are established in reputable laboratories to protect both the animals and the personnel that work with them.

Citation: Kendall L. 2017. Indigenous Zoonotic Agents of Research Animals, p 19-38. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch2
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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1.

Citation: Kendall L. 2017. Indigenous Zoonotic Agents of Research Animals, p 19-38. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch2
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Citation: Kendall L. 2017. Indigenous Zoonotic Agents of Research Animals, p 19-38. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch2
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Citation: Kendall L. 2017. Indigenous Zoonotic Agents of Research Animals, p 19-38. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch2

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