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Chapter 20 : Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory

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Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The control of microbial aerosols is the major driver in the design of microbiological containment laboratories. The provision of a negative-pressure laboratory area with a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered exhausted ventilation system is intended to prevent the escape of infectious aerosols from the facility. The use of directional airflow within open-fronted safety cabinetry is designed to prevent the release of any aerosols from the working area of the cabinets. Class III safety cabinets and isolator systems provide physical barriers between the operator and activity while maintaining negative pressure and high airflows, with HEPA filtration to prevent the release of aerosols. As a last resort, respiratory protection is used to prevent the exposed worker from inhaling the infectious agent. Yet, the average microbiologist may have only a limited understanding of the processes that generate aerosols in the laboratory and may have little knowledge of how effective preventative equipment and processes are.

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
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Figures

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Figure 1

Relationship between deposition velocity and aerodynamic particle diameter. (Crown copyright.)

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
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Figure 2

Demonstration of particle size and accessibility of different areas within the human respiratory tract. Adapted from the Human Respiratory Tract Model ( ).

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
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Figure 3

Aerosol particle sizes which can enter distinct areas within the human respiratory tract. (Data from reference .)

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
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Figure 4

A hierarchy of controls is used to define the measures which can be used to protect staff. (Data from reference .)

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
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Figure 5

Example of a Class I biological safety cabinet. (Data from reference .)

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
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Image of Figure 6
Figure 6

Example of a Class II biological safety cabinet. (Data from reference .)

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
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Image of Figure 7
Figure 7

Example of a Class III biological safety cabinet. (Data from reference .)

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
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References

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Tables

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Table 1.

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
Generic image for table
Table 4.

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20
Generic image for table
Table 5.

Citation: Shieber C, Parks S, Bennett A. 2017. Aerosols in the Microbiology Laboratory, p 411-423. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch20

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