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Chapter 21 : Personal Respiratory Protection

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Abstract:

Respiratory protection is used when workplace air is unsuitable for breathing due to lack of oxygen or unsafe levels of contaminants. Respirators are designated as a last resort or temporary control measure to help reduce contaminant exposures in the workplace to acceptable levels or provide sufficient oxygen for breathing. In accordance with the industrial hygiene hierarchy of controls, available engineering and administrative controls should be implemented before considering personal respiratory protection as a control measure. When necessary, only respirators certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) should be used in the United States. A full respiratory protection program administered by a trained individual as specified by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) must accompany any use of respirators in the workplace. A respiratory protection program is necessary to ensure safe and proper use of respirators and to help avoid misuse or injury or death to the respirator users. Important components of a program include written standard operating procedures (SOPs), medical evaluation, user training, respirator maintenance procedures, and properly fitting the respirator to the user. The program must have a designated and knowledgeable administrator, preferably someone trained in a field of occupational health and safety.

Citation: McCullough N. 2017. Personal Respiratory Protection, p 425-441. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch21
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Figure 1

Supplied-air suit. (Courtesy of ILC Dover, Frederica, DE.)

Citation: McCullough N. 2017. Personal Respiratory Protection, p 425-441. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch21
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

(A) Filtering facepiece respirator, type N95. (B) Combination filtering facepiece respirator, type N95, and surgical mask. (C) Full-facepiece respirator. (D) Powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) with hood. (E) PAPR with loose-fitting facepiece. (Courtesy of 3M Company, St. Paul, MN.)

Citation: McCullough N. 2017. Personal Respiratory Protection, p 425-441. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch21
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References

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Tables

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Table 1.

Citation: McCullough N. 2017. Personal Respiratory Protection, p 425-441. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch21
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Citation: McCullough N. 2017. Personal Respiratory Protection, p 425-441. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch21
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Citation: McCullough N. 2017. Personal Respiratory Protection, p 425-441. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch21
Generic image for table
Table 4.

Citation: McCullough N. 2017. Personal Respiratory Protection, p 425-441. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch21

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