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Chapter 24 : Packing and Shipping Biological Materials

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Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Laboratory workers who ship or transport dangerous goods, in general, and diagnostic specimens and infectious substances, in particular, by a commercial land or air carrier are required to follow a complex and often confusing set of national and international regulations and requirements. The purpose of these regulations and requirements is to protect the public, emergency responders, laboratory workers, and personnel involved in the transportation industry from accidental exposure to the contents of the packages (1–3).

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Figures

Image of Figure 1
Figure 1

Algorithm to help shippers select appropriate packing instructions. The algorithm represents the authors’ interpretations of IATA and DOT regulations.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Labels that indicate an infectious substance (Class 6), proper shipping name, UN identification number, and quantity of substance. In accordance with DOT regulations, the Class 6 Infectious Substance labels with the text “In U.S.A. Notify Director-CDC, Atlanta, GA 1-800-232-0124” are no longer permissible for labeling containers of infectious substances.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 3
Figure 3

Markings that indicate a Biological Substance, Category B, and appropriate UN number.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 4
Figure 4

Label that indicates a miscellaneous (Class 9) dangerous good (2 kg of dry ice).

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 5
Figure 5

Label that indicates the correct orientation of package during shipping.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 6
Figure 6

Label that indicates a substance must be transported only in a cargo (not passenger) aircraft.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 7
Figure 7

Marking that indicates an overpack is used and inner packages comply with regulations.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 8
Figure 8

Label that indicates an exempt human specimen (e.g., blood) being transported for routine diagnostic testing (e.g., cholesterol testing).

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 9
Figure 9

Label that indicates the outer container has met IATA-specified manufacturing standards.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 10
Figure 10

A completely labeled outer package. The primary container inside the package contains an Exempt Human Specimen and is packed according to IATA directions.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 11
Figure 11

A completely labeled outer package. The primary container inside the package contains a Category B infectious substance (diagnostic or clinical specimen) and is packed according to PI 650.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 12
Figure 12

A completely labeled outer package. The primary container inside the package contains a Category A infectious substance and is packed according to PI 620.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 13
Figure 13

Shipper's Declaration for Dangerous Goods and 13 sections which must be completed by the shipper.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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Image of Figure 14
Figure 14

Completed Shipper's Declaration for Dangerous Goods.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
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References

/content/book/10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
1. Denys GA, Gray LD, Snyder JW,. 2004. Cumitech 40, Packing and shipping diagnostic specimens and infectious substances. Sewell DL (ed). ASM Press, Washington, DC.
2. International Air Transport Association. 2015. Dangerous Goods Regulations, 56th ed. International Air Transport Association, Montreal, Canada.
3. Snyder JW. 2002. Packaging and shipping of infectious substances. Clin Microbiol Newsl 24:8993[CrossRef].
4. World Health Organization. 2015. Guidance on regulations for the transport of infectious substances 2015 – 2016. World Health Organization, Geneva (http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/149288/1/WHO_HSE_GCR_2015.2_eng.pdf)
5. McKay J, Fleming DO,. 2000. Packaging and shipping biological materials, p 411423. In Fleming DO, Hunt DL (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, 3rd ed. American Society for Microbiology, Washington, D.C.
6. United States Department of Transportation, Research and Special Programs Administration. 2002. Hazardous materials: revision to standards for infectious substances and genetically modified organisms; final rule. Fed Regist 67:5311853144.
7. United States Department of Transportation, Research and Special Programs Administration. 2004. Harmonization with the United Nations Recommendations, International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code, and International Civil Aviation Organization's Technical Instructions; final rule. Fed Regist 69:7604376187.
8. United States Department of Transportation, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. 2005. Hazardous materials: infectious substances; harmonization with the United Nations recommendations; proposed rule. Fed Regist 96:2917029187.
9. United States Postal Service. 2016. Mailing standards of the United States postal service, domestic mail manual. (http://about.usps.com/manuals/welcome.htm)
10. United States Postal Service. 2015. Publication 52: Hazardous, restricted, and perishable mail. (http://pe.usps.com/text/pub52/welcome.htm)
11. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, United States Department of Agriculture. 2016. Agricultural bioterrorism protection act of 2002: Possession, use, and transfer of biological agents and toxins; final rule (7 CFR Part 331; 9 CFR Part 121). Fed Regist 70:1324213292 http://www.selectagents.gov/.
12. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention and the Office of the Inspector General, United States Department of Health and Human Services. 2016. Possession, use, and transfer of select agents and toxins; final rule (42 CFR Part 73). Fed. Regist. 70:1331613325. http://www.selectagents.gov/

Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 4.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 5.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 6.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24
Generic image for table
Table 7.

Citation: Relich R, Snyder J. 2017. Packing and Shipping Biological Materials, p 475-491. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch24

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