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Chapter 25 : Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture

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Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The past few decades have seen a consistent evolution of approaches to safety and security risk management across a diversity of industries. In their review of this evolution, a U.S. National Academies of Sciences panel reviewing safety culture in academic chemistry laboratories (1) summarized, from safety science literature, three “epochs” that arose in response to accidents: (i) technology, (ii) systems, and (iii) culture.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
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Figures

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Figure 1

Influencing factors on biorisk management culture.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
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Figure 2

Model demonstrating how performance indicators (actions) converge to achieve a desired outcome(s).

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
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Figure 3

Laboratory example of indicators and metrics: checking airflow through the HEPA filter for safe and proper biosafety cabinet function.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
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Figure 4

Administrative example of indicators and metrics: developing, evaluating, and assigning clear responsibilities in biorisk management to specific individual roles.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
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Figure 5

The assessment, mitigation, and performance (AMP) model of biorisk management.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
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References

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1. Committee on Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Academic Laboratory Research; Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology; Division on Earth and Life Studies; Board on Human-Systems Integration; Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education; National Research Council. 2014. Committee on Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Academic Laboratory Research. Safe Science: Promoting a Culture of Safety in Academic Chemical Research. National Academies Press, Washington, D.C.
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Tables

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Table 1.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
Generic image for table
Table 4.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
Generic image for table
Table 5.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25
Generic image for table
Table 6.

Citation: Burnett L. 2017. Developing a Biorisk Management Program to Support Biorisk Management Culture, p 495-510. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch25

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