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Chapter 28 : A “One-Safe” Approach: Continuous Safety Training Initiatives

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A “One-Safe” Approach: Continuous Safety Training Initiatives, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Training prepares people to behave, and it is behavior that connects plans to desired outcomes. The four phases of biological risk mitigation are (i) risk identification, (ii) risk assessment, (iii) risk management, and (iv) risk communication. During the risk identification process, both the agent and processes of working with the agent are reviewed to determine risk, which is assessed and managed primarily through the development of standard operating procedures (SOPs). However, the greatest risk that is often overlooked is the people interacting with agents on a daily basis. How these individuals perceive laboratory risks—their experiences, educational levels, comfort, skills—and the culture of the organization in which they work influence safety attitudes and behaviors. SOPs provide the process to achieve the desired outcome and training ensures consistency of behavior among many individuals with vast differences in education and experience.

Citation: Kaufman S. 2017. A “One-Safe” Approach: Continuous Safety Training Initiatives, p 537-549. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch28
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Figures

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Figure 1

Blending subcultures.

Citation: Kaufman S. 2017. A “One-Safe” Approach: Continuous Safety Training Initiatives, p 537-549. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch28
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Figure 2

Behavioral evolution.

Citation: Kaufman S. 2017. A “One-Safe” Approach: Continuous Safety Training Initiatives, p 537-549. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch28
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References

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Tables

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Table 1.

Citation: Kaufman S. 2017. A “One-Safe” Approach: Continuous Safety Training Initiatives, p 537-549. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch28
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Citation: Kaufman S. 2017. A “One-Safe” Approach: Continuous Safety Training Initiatives, p 537-549. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch28

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