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Chapter 30 : Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories

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Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Any discussion of biological safety within undergraduate basic science and clinical teaching laboratories should be prefaced by several important caveats. First, the foundation of any science laboratory experience should include a solid understanding of safety. Practicing safety teaches responsibility and respect for life and property. Regardless of unique institutional conditions and oversight agencies, adherence to common safety and biosafety practices demonstrates a good-faith effort to students, parents, faculty, administrators, and even accreditors, that academic laboratory users are valued. Additionally, most safety practices were developed in response to documented need and thus serve to mitigate hazards. At its core, the teaching laboratory should be an environment where students are challenged by the science of microbiology, not by fear of infection. Furthermore, as the science of microbiology evolves, time-tested biosafety practices continue as a microbiology legacy, passed down to subsequent generations of microbiologists as résumé staples.

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figures

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Figure 1

Typical model of biosafety oversight in academia. Note that the instructor, being the closest to daily laboratory activities, has the highest level of responsibility to ensure a safe environment (adapted from reference ).

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figure 2

Biosafety regulations, standards, and guidance pertinent to various academic laboratories (adapted from reference ).

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figure 3

Example of the iterative process used to assess the risk associated with each laboratory experiment.

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figure 4

The biosafety level (BSL) is determined from the risk assessment (including the organism risk group), the work practices and techniques to be used, the safety equipment, and the facility design.

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figure 5

Schematic depicting three layers of biohazard reduction whose specific components are determined by risk assessment.

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figure 6

Partial screen captures of the Pathogen Safety Data Sheet for spp. obtained from the Public Health Agency of Canada (http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/lab-bio/res/psds-ftss/index-eng.php).

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figure 7

Examples of materials and designs to wear over street clothes while working in the laboratory. (A) Standard cotton laboratory coat; (B) high collar and cuffed sleeves incorporated into a water-resistant jacket; and (C) waterproof coveralls.

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figure 8

Examples of safety glasses (left) and safety goggles (right).

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figure 9

Technique for the aseptic removal (doffing) of contaminated gloves ( ).

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figure 10

Diagram of a shared teaching laboratory space that might be used as a BSL1 laboratory ( ).

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Figure 11

Diagram of a BSL2 laboratory design (adapted from reference ).

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
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References

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Tables

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Table 1.

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
Generic image for table
Table 4.

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30
Generic image for table
Table 5.

Citation: Woolverton C, Woolverton A. 2017. Biological Safety and Security in Teaching Laboratories, p 565-594. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch30

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