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Chapter 33 : Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy

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Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Similar to human clinical microbiology laboratories, the work performed in veterinary diagnostic laboratories has inherent risk to laboratory workers. According to the 2008 American Veterinary Medical Association “One Health Initiative” task force report (www.avma.org/onehealth), 60% of infectious diseases in humans are due to multihost pathogens that move across species lines (1). Over the last 30 years, 75% of the emerging human pathogens (e.g., West Nile fever, avian influenza, Lyme disease) have been zoonotic (transmitted between animals and humans) (2). Thus, veterinary diagnostic laboratorians are at risk for laboratory-acquired infections (LAIs) from multiple host species pathogens.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
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Figures

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Figure 1

Using biorisk assessment models (BioRAM). The effect of reducing the risk of laboratory-acquired rabies virus infection by providing a mitigation factor—in this case, preexposure rabies virus immunization for laboratory employees handling suspect brain tissue. Demonstration of how a BioRAM user can simulate changing various mitigation factors in their laboratory (in this example, providing preexposure rabies virus immunization for laboratory personnel handling brain tissue) to evaluate which changes will be the most effective in reducing the risk. In this particular example, the reduction in risk is striking; this is not unexpected given that the presence of prophylactic immunization can mean the difference between life and death in the case of a rabies virus exposure. If the mitigation factor did not also affect the consequences, the change would not be as striking. Adapted from reference .

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Zones of containment for a biological spill using a three-person team. Each individual stays in their assigned zone until cleanup is complete. The two individuals in the hot and decon zones wear personal protective equipment (PPE). The individual in the clean zone does not wear PPE. Once cleanup is complete, the individual in the hot zone moves to the decon zone and both individuals perform decontamination followed by removal of PPE.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
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References

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Tables

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Table 1.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 4.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 5.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 6.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 7.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 8.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 9.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 10.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 11.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 12.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 13.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 14.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 15.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 16.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33
Generic image for table
Table 17.

Citation: Baszler T, Graham T. 2017. Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratories and Necropsy, p 619-646. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch33

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