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Chapter 37 : Components of a Biosafety Program for a Clinical Laboratory

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Components of a Biosafety Program for a Clinical Laboratory, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The risk of exposure to infectious agents exists in every clinical laboratory; however, the goal of every clinical laboratory should be to minimize that risk and conduct its activities as safely as possible. To achieve this, a strong culture of biosafety must be in place. The biosafety culture depends on the opinions, beliefs, views, and feelings of all the laboratory staff. When there is a strong culture of biosafety, then every employee accepts responsibility and is accountable to maintain biosafety practices that protect both the employee and coworkers. The major question is how to achieve a strong culture of biosafety. Management has the responsibility to build and sustain that culture. This chapter will explain the required components.

Citation: Pentella M. 2017. Components of a Biosafety Program for a Clinical Laboratory, p 687-694. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch37
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Example of risk assessment tool.

Citation: Pentella M. 2017. Components of a Biosafety Program for a Clinical Laboratory, p 687-694. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch37
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Figure 2

Example of competency assessment form.

Citation: Pentella M. 2017. Components of a Biosafety Program for a Clinical Laboratory, p 687-694. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch37
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References

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1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Institutes of Health. 2009. Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories, 5th ed. HHS Publication no. (CDC) 21-112. http://www.cdc.gov/biosafety/publications/bmbl5/BMBL.pdf.
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12. Shah K, Pentella MA,. 2010. Laboratory biosafety competency development for the BSL-2, 3, and 4, p 67–74. In Richmond JY (ed), Anthropology of Biosafety XII: Worker Safety Issues. American Biological Safety Association, Mundelein, IL.
13. Ned-Sykes R, Johnson C, Ridderhof JC, Perlman E, Pollock A, DeBoy JM Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 2015. Competency guidelines for public health laboratory professionals: CDC and the Association of Public Health Laboratories. MMWR Suppl 64:181. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/ind2015_su.html.[PubMed]
14. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recommended adult immunization, United States. CDC. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp, accessed March 1, 2016.
15. Association of Public Health Laboratories. 2015. A biosafety checklist: developing a culture of biosafety. http://www.aphl.org/AboutAPHL/publications/Documents/ID_BiosafetyChecklist_42015.pdf, accessed March 1, 2016.

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