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Chapter 38 : Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory

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Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

The number of biosafety level 4 (BSL4) maximum-containment laboratories (facilities) worldwide has increased significantly. In the early 1980s, only two such laboratories existed in North America, one at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, GA, and the other at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, MD. By early 2005, there were at least six operational BSL4-capable laboratories in the United States and over a dozen worldwide (1). As of September 2011, there are at least 13 operational or planned BSL4 facilities within the United States (see also http://fas.org/programs/bio/research.html#USBSL4). Canada also has operational BSL4 laboratories in Winnipeg, Manitoba, for the study of both human and animal disease agents. Worldwide there are at least 27 operational BSL4 facilities (2).

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38
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Figures

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Figure 1

Class III biological safety cabinet (CDC).

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38
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Figure 2

Class III biological safety cabinet (USAMRIID).

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38
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Figure 3

Generalized Class III biological safety cabinet laboratory facility.

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38
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Figure 4

Personal protective suit laboratory (CDC).

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38
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Image of Figure 5
Figure 5

Generalized BSL4 protective suit laboratory facility schematic.

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38
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Tables

Generic image for table
Table 1.

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38
Generic image for table
Table 2.

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38
Generic image for table
Table 3.

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38
Generic image for table
Table 4.

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38
Generic image for table
Table 5.

Citation: Bressler D, Hawley R. 2017. Safety Considerations in the Biosafety Level 4 Maximum-Containment Laboratory, p 695-717. In Wooley D, Byers K (ed), Biological Safety: Principles and Practices, Fifth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781555819637.ch38

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