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Chapter 16 : Emerging and Reemerging Plagues

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Abstract:

–George Santayana

Diseases caused by infectious agents can affect the course of human events. They have in the past, and it is certain they will do so in the future. Great plagues, such as the bubonic plague or influenza, can happen again. Plagues are natural and almost predictable phenomena. Although remarkable scientific advances have been made in controlling diseases through sanitation, chemotherapy, antisepsis, antibiotics, improved nutrition, and immunization, we continue to live in evolutionary competition with microbes, and there is no guarantee that we can always beat them at their own game. Lurking out there are germs and worms that may spread to our domestic animals, our domesticated plants, and us. These are the seeds of coming plagues.

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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Figures

Image of Figure 16.1
Figure 16.1

by Edvard Munch 1893, Courtesy Wikipedia

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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Image of Figure 16.2
Figure 16.2

A digitally- colorized transmission electron microscopic image of a coronavirus similar to that causing SARS. Courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library #15523/Fred Murphy and Sylvia Whitfield, 1975.

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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Image of Figure 16.3
Figure 16.3

A transmission electron microscopic image of the West Nile viruses. Courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library #10700/Cynthia Goldsmith and P. E. Rollin.

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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Image of Figure 16.4
Figure 16.4

A transmission electron microscopic image of showing a dividing bacillus (A) and the spore (B), Courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library #1813/ Dr. Sherif Zaki and Elizabeth White.

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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Image of Figure 16.5
Figure 16.5

A stained section of cow brain tissue with BSE showing the presence of “holes” giving it a spongelike appearance. Courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library #5435/Al Jenny, USDA-APHIS, 2003.

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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Image of Figure 16.6
Figure 16.6

A colorized transmission electron microscopic image of the filamentous Ebola virus. Courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library #10815/Frederick A. Murphy.

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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Image of Figure 16.7
Figure 16.7

A digitally colorized transmission electron microscopic image of Zika viruses showing outer envelope and inner dense core. Courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library #20538/ Cynthia Goldsmith, 2016.

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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Image of Figure 16.8
Figure 16.8

Silver-stained spirochetes . Courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library #835 , Edwin P. Ewing Jr.

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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Image of Figure 16.9
Figure 16.9

Adult female western blackfooted tick the vector of Lyme disease. Courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library #8686/James Gathany et al. , 2006.

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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Image of Figure 16.10
Figure 16.10

“Bull’s eye” rash at the site of the tick bite in a Maryland woman who subsequently developed Lyme disease. Photo courtesy CDC Public Health Image Library #9875 James Gathany, 2007.

Citation: Sherman I. 2017. Emerging and Reemerging Plagues, p 410-445. In The Power of Plagues, Second Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670018.ch16
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