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Section 5 : Viral Diagnosis

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Viral Diagnosis, Page 1 of 2

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Abstract:

Historically, viral infections have been diagnosed by culture in primary or continuous cell lines and by detection of antibody responses to infection. However, these methods are insensitive and slow, such that results are rarely available in a clinically relevant time frame. Molecular methods or nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) have replaced culture due to their superior sensitivity and more rapid turnaround time. In addition, antigen capture immunoassays, which allow for the direct detection of viruses in clinical specimens, have also been widely adopted. Despite these technological advances, serology remains an important diagnostic tool for many viral infections. Initially, many serological tests were conducted with the labor-intensive complement fixation and neutralization tests. However, those methods have largely been replaced by commercially prepared enzyme immunoassays. This technical change allows many smaller laboratories to perform tests that were previously available only in reference laboratories. This section summarizes the tests currently available for the laboratory diagnosis of the most common viral infections. For additional information, the reader is referred to the ASM and by Specter et al. (see the Bibliography).

Citation: Doern C. 2018. Viral Diagnosis, p 220-239. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670070.ch5
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References

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Tables

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Table 5.1

 Detection Methods for Viruses 221

Citation: Doern C. 2018. Viral Diagnosis, p 220-239. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670070.ch5
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Table 5.2

 Cells Used for Viral Isolation

Citation: Doern C. 2018. Viral Diagnosis, p 220-239. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670070.ch5
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Table 5.3

EBV serologic profiles under different conditions

Citation: Doern C. 2018. Viral Diagnosis, p 220-239. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670070.ch5
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Table 5.4

Hepatitis B virus markers in different stages of infection and convalescence

Citation: Doern C. 2018. Viral Diagnosis, p 220-239. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670070.ch5
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Table 5.5

Clinical diseases of parvovirus B19 and method of diagnosis

Citation: Doern C. 2018. Viral Diagnosis, p 220-239. In Pocket Guide to Clinical Microbiology, Fourth Edition. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670070.ch5

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