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Chapter 8 : When Bacteria Kill Each Other

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Abstract:

In all domains of life, the fight for survival naturally favors the fittest, that is, those best adapted to the surrounding conditions. This is the phenomenon of natural selection. The transmission of acquired characteristics contributes to evolution and the development of new species. Although Charles Darwin (1809–1882) was not familiar with bacteria, his ideas are readily applicable to them. The bacterial world, just like the finches Darwin observed in the Galapagos Islands, is constantly adapting and evolving.

Citation: Cossart P. 2018. When Bacteria Kill Each Other, p 49-53. In The New Microbiology: From Microbiomes to CRISPR. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670117.ch8
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Figures

Image of Figure 14.
Figure 14.

Type VI and type III secretion systems.

Citation: Cossart P. 2018. When Bacteria Kill Each Other, p 49-53. In The New Microbiology: From Microbiomes to CRISPR. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670117.ch8
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