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Chapter 11 : Endosymbiotic Relationships

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Abstract:

Symbiotic relationships between bacteria and eukaryotes (humans, animals, and plants) are generally beneficial to at least one of the partners involved. symbioses can arise, fade, and sometimes recur. symbioses, however, become established by evolution over time. They are particularly common in insects: 10 to 12% of insects carry intracellular symbionts, known as . Endosymbiosis has contributed to the evolutionary and ecological success of many insect species, providing properties that allow them to adapt to niches that would be otherwise inaccessible. The first endosymbionts are thought to have been mitochondria and chloroplasts in eukaryotic cells. In this process, a cell with a nucleus would have established an obligate symbiotic relationship with a photosynthetic bacterium, ultimately evolving into plant cell chloroplasts, or with a nonphotosynthetic bacterium, ultimately becoming the mitochondria found in all eukaryotic cells.

Citation: Cossart P. 2018. Endosymbiotic Relationships, p 73-78. In The New Microbiology: From Microbiomes to CRISPR. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670117.ch11
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Figures

Image of Figure 15.
Figure 15.

Cytoplasmic incompatibility. Mating between an uninfected female mosquito and an uninfected male produces offspring; however, if the male is infected with a member of the species, no offspring are produced. When an infected female mates with any male (infected or uninfected), offspring are produced and all are infected because is transmitted by female cells.

Citation: Cossart P. 2018. Endosymbiotic Relationships, p 73-78. In The New Microbiology: From Microbiomes to CRISPR. ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: 10.1128/9781683670117.ch11
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