1887

Kirby-Bauer Disk Diffusion Susceptibility Test Protocol

  • Author: Jan Hudzicki1
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, 66160
  • Citation: Jan Hudzicki. 2009. Kirby-bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol.
  • Publication Date : December 2009
  • Category: Protocol
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
Add to My Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/education/protocol/protocol.3189.html?itemId=/content/education/protocol/protocol.3189&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Figures

Image of Figure 1

Click to view

Figure 1

FIG. 1 . McFarland standards (left to right) 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, positioned in front of a Wickerham card. McFarland standards are used to prepare bacterial suspensions to a specified turbidity. In the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol, the bacterial suspension of the organism to be tested should be equivalent to the 0.5 McFarland standard.(Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 2

Click to view

Figure 2

FIG. 2. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol, inoculation of the test plate. Step 2. Rotate the swab against the side of the tube while applying pressure to remove excess liquid from the swab prior to inoculating the plate. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 3

Click to view

Figure 3

FIG. 3. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol, inoculation of the Mueller-Hinton agar plate. Step 3. Inoculate the plate with the test organism by streaking the swab in a back-and-forth motion very close together as you move across and down the plate.Rotate the plate 60° and repeat this action. Rotate the plate once more and repeat the streaking action. This method ensures an even distribution of inoculum that will result in a confluent lawn of growth. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 4

Click to view

Figure 4

FIG. 4. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol, inoculation of the Mueller-Hinton agar plate. Diagram illustrating the pattern the swab should follow as it is drawn across the plate.

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 5

Click to view

Figure 5

FIG. 5. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol, inoculation of the Mueller-Hinton agar plate. Diagram illustrating the pattern the swab should follow as it is drawn across the plate.

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 6

Click to view

Figure 6

FIG. 6. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol, inoculation of the Mueller-Hinton agar plate. After streaking the Mueller-Hinton agar plate as described in Step 3, rim the plate with the swab by running the swab around the edge of the entire the plate to pick up any excessive inoculum that may have been splashed near the edge. The arrow indicates the path of the swab.

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 7

Click to view

Figure 7

FIG. 7. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol, placement of antimicrobial disks using an automated disk dispenser. Step 1. An automatic disk dispenser can be used to place multiple disks simultaneously on a Mueller-Hinton agar plate.Set the dispenser over the plate. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 8

Click to view

Figure 8

FIG. 8. Place the palm of your hand on the top of the handle. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 9

Click to view

Figure 9

FIG. 9 Press down firmly and completely to dispense the disks. The spring-loaded handle will return to the original position when pressure is removed. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 10

Click to view

Figure 10

FIG. 10. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol, placement of antimicrobial disks using forceps to manually place the disks. Step 1. Antimicrobial disks can be manually placed on the Mueller-Hinton agar plate if desired.Place the Mueller-Hinton agar plate over the disk template. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 11

Click to view

Figure 11

FIG. 11. Remove one disk from the cartridge using forceps that have been sterilized.(Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 12

Click to view

Figure 12

FIG. 12. Lift the lid of the plate and place the disk over one of the positioning marks.(Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 13

Click to view

Figure 13

FIG. 13. Press the disk with the forceps to ensure complete contact with the agar surface. Replace the lid of the plate between disks to minimize exposure to air-borne contaminants. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 14

Click to view

Figure 14

FIG. 14. Manual disk placement template for eight disks on a 100-mm plate. Place the Mueller-Hinton agar plate on the figure so that the edge of the plate lines up with the outer circle. Remove the lid from the plate and place one antimicrobial disk over each dark gray circle. If fewer than eight antimicrobial disks are used, adjustments can be made to the spacing of the disks. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 15

Click to view

Figure 15

FIG. 15. Measuring zones of inhibition. Gray shading represents a confluent lawn of bacterial growth. The white circle represents no growth of the test organism.(Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 16

Click to view

Figure 16

FIG. 16. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol, measuring zone sizes. Using a ruler or caliper measure each zone with the unaided eye while viewing the back of the petri dish. Hold the plate a few inches above a black, nonreflecting surface illuminated with reflected light. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 17

Click to view

Figure 17

FIG. 17.The size of the zone for this organism-antimicrobial combination is 26 mm. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
Image of Figure 18

Click to view

Figure 18

FIG. 18. Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test protocol, an alternate method for measuring zones. If the zones of adjacent antimicrobial disks overlap, the zone diameter can be determined by measuring the radius of the zone. Measure from the center of the antimicrobial disk to a point on the circumference of the zone where a distinct edge is present. Multiply this measurement by 2 to determine the diameter of the zone of inhibition. In this example, the radius of the zone is 16 mm. Multiply this measurement by 2 to determine a zone size of 32 mm for this organism-antimicrobial combination. (Jan Hudzicki, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS)

Source: December 2009
Download as Powerpoint
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error