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Peri- and Postharvest Factors in the Control of Shiga Toxin-Producing in Beef

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  • Authors: Rodney A. Moxley1, Gary R. Acuff2
  • Editors: Vanessa Sperandio3, Carolyn J. Hovde4
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583-0905; 2: Department of Animal Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-2471; 3: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX; 4: University of Idaho, Moscow, ID
  • Source: microbiolspec November 2014 vol. 2 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EHEC-0017-2013
  • Received 31 August 2013 Accepted 02 October 2013 Published 07 November 2014
  • Rodney A. Moxley, rmoxley1@unl.edu
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  • Abstract:

    Certain Shiga toxin-producing (STEC) strains are important causes of food-borne disease, with hemorrhagic colitis and, in some cases, hemolytic-uremic syndrome as the clinical manifestations of illness. Six serogroups and one serotype of STEC (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157:H7) are responsible for the vast majority of cases in the United States. Based on recent data for all food commodities combined, 55.3% and 50.0% of the outbreaks of STEC O157 and non-O157 in the United States, respectively, are attributable to beef as a food source. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service declared these organisms as adulterants in raw, nonintact beef. In North America, cattle are a major reservoir of STEC strains, with organisms shed in the feces and contaminated hides of the animals being the main vehicle for spread to carcasses at slaughter. A number of peri- and postharvest interventions targeting STEC have been developed, and significant progress has been made in improving the microbiological quality of beef in the past 20 years as a result. However, continued improvements are needed, and accurate assessment of these interventions, especially for non-O157 STEC, would greatly benefit from improvements in detection methods for these organisms.

  • Citation: Moxley R, Acuff G. 2014. Peri- and Postharvest Factors in the Control of Shiga Toxin-Producing in Beef. Microbiol Spectrum 2(6):EHEC-0017-2013. doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EHEC-0017-2013.

Key Concept Ranking

Meat and Meat Products
0.5933191
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
0.4468175
Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis
0.42286566
Food Safety
0.41544697
Lactic Acid Bacteria
0.4040421
0.5933191

References

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2014-11-07
2017-09-24

Abstract:

Certain Shiga toxin-producing (STEC) strains are important causes of food-borne disease, with hemorrhagic colitis and, in some cases, hemolytic-uremic syndrome as the clinical manifestations of illness. Six serogroups and one serotype of STEC (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157:H7) are responsible for the vast majority of cases in the United States. Based on recent data for all food commodities combined, 55.3% and 50.0% of the outbreaks of STEC O157 and non-O157 in the United States, respectively, are attributable to beef as a food source. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service declared these organisms as adulterants in raw, nonintact beef. In North America, cattle are a major reservoir of STEC strains, with organisms shed in the feces and contaminated hides of the animals being the main vehicle for spread to carcasses at slaughter. A number of peri- and postharvest interventions targeting STEC have been developed, and significant progress has been made in improving the microbiological quality of beef in the past 20 years as a result. However, continued improvements are needed, and accurate assessment of these interventions, especially for non-O157 STEC, would greatly benefit from improvements in detection methods for these organisms.

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USDA-FSIS table of safe and suitable antimicrobials for beef

Source: microbiolspec November 2014 vol. 2 no. 6 doi:10.1128/microbiolspec.EHEC-0017-2013

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