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Evolution and Genomics

The Influence of Ecological Factors on the Distribution and the Genetic Structure of

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  • Author: David M. Gordon1
  • Editor: David A. Rasko2
  • VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: School of Botany and Zoology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia; 2: University of Maryland, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Received 23 July 2003 Accepted 10 October 2003 Published 27 February 2004
  • Address correspondence to David M. Gordon David.Gordon@anu.edu.au.
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  • Abstract:

    This review focuses on recent data concerning the ecological factors that determine the distribution of and the genetic structures of naturally occurring populations. It summarizes some of the older literature concerning the dynamics of populations within a host and poses some questions that arise from our more recently acquired understanding of the factors affecting the genetic structures of populations. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) studies indicate that , relative to other members of the family , exhibits a moderate degree of genetic diversity. The existence of subspecific structure in has for the most part been determined by largely neutral in its effects on the fitness of a strain. The consequences for of the transition between its primary and secondary habitats are of considerable practical significance for water quality assessment and disease transmission. causes a significant fraction of human bacterial disease and is responsible for two main types of disease in humans and domestic animals: diarrheal disease and extraintestinal infections. The observed distribution of strains from the different genetic groups indicates that they have different life history tactics and ecological niches. A and B1 strains appear to be generalists, as they can be recovered from any vertebrate group. Group B2 and D strains appear to be more specialized, as they are largely restricted to endothermic vertebrates.

  • Citation: Gordon D. 2004. The Influence of Ecological Factors on the Distribution and the Genetic Structure of , EcoSal Plus 2004; doi:10.1128/ecosalplus.6.4.1

Key Concept Ranking

Urinary Tract Infections
0.5863814
Lower Gastrointestinal Tract
0.49454927
Bacterial Diseases
0.486436
Escherichia coli
0.4392545
Klebsiella pneumoniae
0.43650794
0.5863814

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2004-02-27
2017-06-27

Abstract:

This review focuses on recent data concerning the ecological factors that determine the distribution of and the genetic structures of naturally occurring populations. It summarizes some of the older literature concerning the dynamics of populations within a host and poses some questions that arise from our more recently acquired understanding of the factors affecting the genetic structures of populations. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) studies indicate that , relative to other members of the family , exhibits a moderate degree of genetic diversity. The existence of subspecific structure in has for the most part been determined by largely neutral in its effects on the fitness of a strain. The consequences for of the transition between its primary and secondary habitats are of considerable practical significance for water quality assessment and disease transmission. causes a significant fraction of human bacterial disease and is responsible for two main types of disease in humans and domestic animals: diarrheal disease and extraintestinal infections. The observed distribution of strains from the different genetic groups indicates that they have different life history tactics and ecological niches. A and B1 strains appear to be generalists, as they can be recovered from any vertebrate group. Group B2 and D strains appear to be more specialized, as they are largely restricted to endothermic vertebrates.

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Figures

Image of Figure 1
Figure 1

The solid line depicts the relationship between body mass and prevalence as determined from the data for 209 individuals belonging to the order Dasyuromorphia. The points represent the observed prevalences for carnivorous species, where is >5. The circles indicate species in the order Chiroptera, the squares indicate species in the order Dasyuromorpha, and the triangles indicate species in the order Monotremata.

Citation: Gordon D. 2004. The Influence of Ecological Factors on the Distribution and the Genetic Structure of , EcoSal Plus 2004; doi:10.1128/ecosalplus.6.4.1
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Image of Figure 2
Figure 2

Red, reference (ECOR) group A; blue, ECOR group B1; pink, ECOR group B2; green, ECOR group D.

Citation: Gordon D. 2004. The Influence of Ecological Factors on the Distribution and the Genetic Structure of , EcoSal Plus 2004; doi:10.1128/ecosalplus.6.4.1
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Image of Figure 3
Figure 3

The bars represent group A, B1, B2, and D strains, as indicated.

Citation: Gordon D. 2004. The Influence of Ecological Factors on the Distribution and the Genetic Structure of , EcoSal Plus 2004; doi:10.1128/ecosalplus.6.4.1
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Image of Figure 4
Figure 4

The bars represent group A, B1, B2, and D strains, as indicated.

Citation: Gordon D. 2004. The Influence of Ecological Factors on the Distribution and the Genetic Structure of , EcoSal Plus 2004; doi:10.1128/ecosalplus.6.4.1
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