1887

Transforming a Sequence of Microbiology Courses Using Student Profile Data

    Authors: ROSA J. BUXEDA1,*, DEBORAH A. MOORE2
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology and; 2: Department of Mathematics, University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681-9012
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • The Soloman and Felder instrument to assess learning styles, Index of Learning Styles, is available electronically at http://www2.ncsu.edu/effective_teaching/ .
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, P.O. Box 9012, Mayagüez, PR 00681-9012. Phone: (787) 832-4040 ext. 2174. Fax: (787) 831-5249. E-mail: [email protected].
    • Copyright © 2000, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2000 vol. 1 no. 1 1-6. doi:10.1128/154288100X14285805455897
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    Abstract:

    A study was performed in the General Microbiology and Industrial Microbiology courses to increase research awareness at an early stage of the educational process and to establish collaboration between students in an Industrial Microbiology program and industry. In both courses, the professor helped students determine their learning styles and then used these data to design activities in order to accomplish the above objectives. In both the treatment and the control sections, students learned about strategies to optimize learning based on their learning styles. A cooperative learning format was introduced to promote active learning and team-building skills. The diverse learning styles data profile was used by students during cooperative learning activities for effective team integration. In the General Microbiology course, a mentor-mentee structure was introduced to expose students to research in microbiology by visiting research facilities on campus. This structure was an addition to the regular curriculum, which meets American Society for Microbiology curriculum recommendations. The results suggest an increase in interest in research by students. In the Industrial Microbiology course, a strategy was introduced to establish collaboration with industry in which students visit the workplace and identify microbial processes, microbiologist roles, and skills needed by microbiologists. Evaluation of these topics using pre- and posttest data indicates a significant increase in acquired knowledge relevant to daily workplace environments with the reformed course. In both courses, students gain information early in their academic experience to help them consider participation in research experiences while providing them with real-world experience toward the end of their academic careers, when they see the need for it.

Key Concept Ranking

Culture Media
0.4785264
Electron Microscopy
0.4785264
Culture Media
0.4785264
Electron Microscopy
0.4785264
Food Microbiology
0.42625886
Microbial Ecology
0.42625886
0.4785264

References & Citations

1. Advisory Committee to the National Science Foundation Directorate for Education and Human Resources 1996 Shaping the future: new expectations for undergraduate education in science, mathematics, engineering and technology iii National Science Foundation Arlington, Va.
2. Anderson R 1997 Recommendations for the introductory microbiology laboratory core curriculum Focus Microbiol 4 1 2
3. Association of Industries in Puerto Rico 1998 Report of the education committee on the industrial needs in Puerto Rico Association of Industries in Puerto Rico San Juan, P.R.
4. Astin AW 1993 What matters in college: four critical years revisited Jossey Bass San Francisco, Calif
5. Barr RB, Tagg J 1995 From teaching to learning–a new paradigm for undergraduate education Change November/December 13 25
6. Brown J, Collins A, Duguid P 1989 Situated cognition and the culture of learning Educ Res 18 1 32 42
7. Buxeda RJ, Moore DA 1999 Using learning styles data to design a microbiology course J Coll Sci Teaching 29 3 159 164
8. Douthwright J 1994 Undergraduate microbiology curriculum recommendations ASM News 60 460 461
9. Ewell PT 1997 Organizing for learning a new imperative AAHE Bull 50 4 3 6
10. Felder RM 1993 Reaching the second tier—learning and teaching styles in college science education J Coll Sci Teaching 23 5 286 290
11. Felder RM, Silverman LK 1988 Learning and teaching styles in engineering education Eng Educ 78 7 674
12. Johnson DW, Johnson RT 1993 What we know about cooperative learning at the college level Coop Learning Mag Coop Higher Educ 13 30 17 18
13. Johnson DW, Johnson RT, Smith KA 1991 Active learning: cooperation in the classroom Interaction Press Edina, Minn.
14. Leinhardt G 1988 Situated knowledge and expertise in teaching 146 168 Calderhead J Teacher’s professional learning Falmer Press London, United Kingdom
15. Leinhardt G 1992 What research on learning tells us about teaching Educ. Leadership April 20 25
16. McKeachie W 1980 Improving lectures by understanding students’ information processing: learning, cognition and college teaching New directions for teaching and learning, no 2 Jossey-Bass San Francisco, Calif
17. Papalia D, Wendkos O 1989 Human development McGraw-Hill New York, N.Y.
18. Slavin RE 1991 Synthesis of research on cooperative learning Educ Res 4 1 67 77
19. Slavin RE 1993 What post secondary cooperative learning learns from elementary and secondary research Coop Learning Coll Teaching 4 11 2 3

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/154288100X14285805455897
2000-05-01
2019-06-17

Abstract:

A study was performed in the General Microbiology and Industrial Microbiology courses to increase research awareness at an early stage of the educational process and to establish collaboration between students in an Industrial Microbiology program and industry. In both courses, the professor helped students determine their learning styles and then used these data to design activities in order to accomplish the above objectives. In both the treatment and the control sections, students learned about strategies to optimize learning based on their learning styles. A cooperative learning format was introduced to promote active learning and team-building skills. The diverse learning styles data profile was used by students during cooperative learning activities for effective team integration. In the General Microbiology course, a mentor-mentee structure was introduced to expose students to research in microbiology by visiting research facilities on campus. This structure was an addition to the regular curriculum, which meets American Society for Microbiology curriculum recommendations. The results suggest an increase in interest in research by students. In the Industrial Microbiology course, a strategy was introduced to establish collaboration with industry in which students visit the workplace and identify microbial processes, microbiologist roles, and skills needed by microbiologists. Evaluation of these topics using pre- and posttest data indicates a significant increase in acquired knowledge relevant to daily workplace environments with the reformed course. In both courses, students gain information early in their academic experience to help them consider participation in research experiences while providing them with real-world experience toward the end of their academic careers, when they see the need for it.

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