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Successful Application of Active Learning Techniques to Introductory Microbiology

    Author: ELIZABETH A. HOFFMAN1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Ashland Community College, Ashland, Kentucky 41101
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Ashland Community College, 1400 College Dr., Ashland, KY 41101. Phone: (606) 326-2067. Fax: (606) 326-2186. E-mail: elizabeth.hoffman@kctcs.net.
    • Copyright © 2001, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2001 vol. 2 no. 1 5-11. doi:10.1128/154288101X14285805983179
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    Abstract:

    While the traditional lecture format may be a successful way to teach microbiology to both medical and nursing students, it was not an effective means of learning for many prenursing and preprofessional students enrolled in either of the introductory microbiology courses at Ashland Community College, an open enrollment institution. The structure of both Medical Microbiology and Principles of Microbiology was redesigned to allow students to address the material in an active manner. Daily quizzes, student group discussions, scrapbooks, lab project presentations and papers, and extra credit projects were all added in order to allow students maximum exposure to the course material in a manner compatible with various methods of learning. Student knowledge, course evaluations, and student success rates have all improved with the active learning format.

Key Concept Ranking

Hepatitis E
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Staphylococcus aureus
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Differential Media
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References & Citations

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/154288101X14285805983179
2001-05-01
2017-11-19

Abstract:

While the traditional lecture format may be a successful way to teach microbiology to both medical and nursing students, it was not an effective means of learning for many prenursing and preprofessional students enrolled in either of the introductory microbiology courses at Ashland Community College, an open enrollment institution. The structure of both Medical Microbiology and Principles of Microbiology was redesigned to allow students to address the material in an active manner. Daily quizzes, student group discussions, scrapbooks, lab project presentations and papers, and extra credit projects were all added in order to allow students maximum exposure to the course material in a manner compatible with various methods of learning. Student knowledge, course evaluations, and student success rates have all improved with the active learning format.

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FIG. 1

Sample student worksheet.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2001 vol. 2 no. 1 5-11. doi:10.1128/154288101X14285805983179
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FIG. 2

Student success as determined by the percentage of students achieving a grade of A, B, or C in Medical Microbiology or Principles of Microbiology out of total students enrolled in the course on the last day to add the class. Data collected in lecture classes was determined in spring semester (S) of 1995. Data collected with active learning classes was determined during fall semester (F) of 1995 through spring semester of 1999.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2001 vol. 2 no. 1 5-11. doi:10.1128/154288101X14285805983179
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