1887

Learning Microbiology Through Cooperation: Designing Cooperative Learning Activities that Promote Interdependence, Interaction, and Accountability

    Authors: JANINE E. TREMPY1,*, MONICA M. SKINNER1, WILLIAM A. SIEBOLD1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Microbiology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-3804
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Microbiology, Nash Hall 220, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3804. Phone: (541) 737-4441. Fax: (541) 737-0496. E-mail: trempyj@orst.edu.
    • Copyright © 2002, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2002 vol. 3 no. 1 26-36. doi:10.1128/154288102X14285807693547
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    Abstract:

    A microbiology course and its corresponding learning activities have been structured according to the Cooperative Learning Model. This course, , integrates science, math, engineering, and technology (SMET) majors and non-SMET majors into teams of students charged with problem solving activities that are microbial in origin. In this study we describe development of learning activities that utilize key components of Cooperative Learning—positive interdependence, promotive interaction, individual accountability, teamwork skills, and group processing. Assessments and evaluations over an 8-year period demonstrate high retention of key concepts in microbiology and high student satisfaction with the course.

Key Concept Ranking

Environmental Microbiology
0.5964016
Ebola Virus
0.5069413
Infectious Diseases
0.49965432
Carbon Dioxide
0.47976655
0.5964016

References & Citations

1. American Association for the Advancement of Science 1993 Benchmarks for science literacy Oxford University Press New York, N.Y.
2. American Association for the Advancement of Science 1998 Project 2061: science literacy for a changing future American Association for the Advancement of Science Washington, D.C.
3. Johnson DW, Johnson RT 1978 Cooperative, competitive, and individualistic learning J Res Dev Educ 12 8 15
4. Johnson DW, Johnson RT 1989 Cooperation and competition: theory and research Interaction Book Co. Edina, Minn.
5. Johnson DW, Johnson RT 1991 Learning together and alone: cooperation, competition, and individualization 3rd ed Prentice Hall Englewood Cliffs, N.J.
6. Johnson DW, Johnson RT 1992 Positive interdependence: the heart of cooperative learning Interaction Book Co. Edina, Minn.
7. Johnson DW, Johnson RT 1993 What we know about cooperative learning at the college level Coop Learning Mag Coop Higher Educ 13 17 18
8. Johnson DW, Johnson RT, Holubec EJ 1994 The nuts and bolts of cooperative learning Interaction Book Co. Edina, Minn.
9. Johnson DW, Johnson RT, Holubec EJ 1998 Cooperation in the classroom 7th ed. Interaction Book Co. Edina, Minn.
10. Johnson DW, Johnson RT, Ortiz A, Stanne M 1991 Impact of positive goal and resource interdependence on achievement, interaction, and attitudes J Gen Psychol 118 4 341 347 10.1080/00221309.1991.9917795 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00221309.1991.9917795
11. Johnson DW, Johnson RT, Smith KA 1998 Active learning: cooperation in the college classroom Interaction Press Edina, Minn.
12. Lew M, Mesch D, Johnson DW, Johnson RT 1986 Positive interdependence, academic and collaborative skills: group contingencies and isolated students Am Educ Res J 23 476 488
13. Mesch D, Johnson DW, Johnson RT 1988 Impact of positive interdependence and academic group contingencies on achievement J Social Psychol 28 845 852
14. National Science Foundation 1996 Indicators of science and mathematics education in 1995 National Science Foundation Arlington, Va.
15. Slavin RE 1991 Synthesis of research on cooperative learning Educ Res 4 67 77
16. Slavin RE 1993 What post secondary cooperative learning learns from elementary and secondary research Coop Learning Coll Teaching 4 2 3
17. Trempy JE 2000 Building teams of diverse students to cooperatively solve problems of microbial origin Focus Microbiol Educ 6 3 7 9
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/154288102X14285807693547
2002-05-01
2017-11-20

Abstract:

A microbiology course and its corresponding learning activities have been structured according to the Cooperative Learning Model. This course, , integrates science, math, engineering, and technology (SMET) majors and non-SMET majors into teams of students charged with problem solving activities that are microbial in origin. In this study we describe development of learning activities that utilize key components of Cooperative Learning—positive interdependence, promotive interaction, individual accountability, teamwork skills, and group processing. Assessments and evaluations over an 8-year period demonstrate high retention of key concepts in microbiology and high student satisfaction with the course.

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Figures

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FIG. 1

Timeline of benchmarks and corresponding actions (learning activities) for MB390 and used in Cooperative Learning. This timeline is based on a 10-week academic quarter with 80 students per course section. Twenty teams of four students per team work on 20 different microbial problems with 80 unique expert roles.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2002 vol. 3 no. 1 26-36. doi:10.1128/154288102X14285807693547
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Image of FIG. 2A

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FIG. 2A

Scenario structure: components integrated to create a team learning activity based on an infectious disease and biosafety issue.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2002 vol. 3 no. 1 26-36. doi:10.1128/154288102X14285807693547
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Image of FIG. 2B

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FIG. 2B

Scenario structure: component parts integrated to create a cooperative learning activity based on an environmental microbiology (bacterial) issue.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2002 vol. 3 no. 1 26-36. doi:10.1128/154288102X14285807693547
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