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Effectiveness of an Applied Microbiology Course Specifically Designed for Chemical Engineering Majors

    Authors: GREGORY B. HECHT1,*, PATRICIA MOSTO1, C. STEWART SLATER2
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences and; 2: Department of Chemical Engineering, Rowan University, Glassboro, New Jersey 08028
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biological Sciences, Rowan University, 201 Mullica Hill Road, Glassboro, NJ 08028. Phone: (856) 256-4500, ext. 3577. Fax: (856) 256-4921. E-mail: hecht@rowan.edu.
    • Copyright © 2003, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2003 vol. 4 no. 1 13-22. doi:10.1128/154288103X14285806150341
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    Abstract:

    In recent years, the disciplines of microbiology and chemical engineering have developed an increasing convergence. To meet the needs of their future employers, today’s chemical engineering students must receive some background in microbiology. This report describes the development and content of “Biological Systems and Applications,” a novel course specifically designed to provide basic biology and applied microbiology knowledge, skills, and experience to sophomore chemical engineering majors. Data collected from entrance and exit surveys of the students demonstrated that the course is successful. The importance of the “project-base” learning technique and of interdisciplinary faculty-student and faculty-faculty collaborations are proposed as elements essential to the success of this particular course.

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Environmental Microbiology
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References & Citations

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3. Engineering Deans Council and Corporate Roundtable of the American Society for Engineering Education1994Engineering education for a changing world, joint project report of the Engineering Deans Council and Corporate Roundtable of the American Society for Engineering EducationAmerican Society for Engineering EducationWashington, D.C.
4. Hollar K, Lau F, Head L, Jahan K, Constans E, vonLockette P, Pietrucha B2002Bugbots—a multidisciplinary design project for engineering studentsProceedings of the 2002 Annual Conference American Society for Engineering EducationWashington, D.C.
5. Jacklet A1992Laboratory manual to accompany “Life,”18Wm. C. Brown PublishersDubuque, Iowa
6. Johnson F, Marchese A, Mosto P2001Crossing interdisciplinary boundaries: impediments to and enablers of faculty collaboration and integrationDepartment Chair Accredita112022
7. Madigan MT, Martinko JM, Parker J2000Brock microbiology of organisms9th edPrentice-Hall IncUpper Saddle River, N.J.
8. Mosto P2001Project base learning, reflectionsCommunique523
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10. Slater CS, Farrell S, Hesketh RP, Dahm KD2001A project-based approach to teaching membrane technologyProceedings of the 2001 Annual Conference American Society for Engineering EducationWashington, D.C.
11. Stryer L1995Biochemistry4th ed.325360W. H. Freeman and CompanyNew York, N.Y.
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/154288103X14285806150341
2003-05-01
2017-11-24

Abstract:

In recent years, the disciplines of microbiology and chemical engineering have developed an increasing convergence. To meet the needs of their future employers, today’s chemical engineering students must receive some background in microbiology. This report describes the development and content of “Biological Systems and Applications,” a novel course specifically designed to provide basic biology and applied microbiology knowledge, skills, and experience to sophomore chemical engineering majors. Data collected from entrance and exit surveys of the students demonstrated that the course is successful. The importance of the “project-base” learning technique and of interdisciplinary faculty-student and faculty-faculty collaborations are proposed as elements essential to the success of this particular course.

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Figures

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FIG. 1

Example of the format used to solicit responses to entrance and exit survey questions.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2003 vol. 4 no. 1 13-22. doi:10.1128/154288103X14285806150341
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FIG. 2

Assessment of overall course success. Bar graphs indicate the number of respondents selecting a particular choice on the survey sheet. In those cases where only exit survey results are presented, the particular question was not asked on the entrance survey. Except where indicated, entrance and exit survey questions were identical. For the entrance survey, = 14. For the exit survey, = 12 (except for panels C and D, where one of the participants elected not to respond to a particular question). In panel E, the one respondent who indicated “Neutral or Not Sure” added the following note to their answer for this question: “It made the class more interesting.” values shown indicate results of a Fisher’s Exact Test performed on the entrance and exit results. values < 0.05 are significant. The value reported in panel A may indicate marginal significance and additional trials would be required to demonstrate strong significance.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2003 vol. 4 no. 1 13-22. doi:10.1128/154288103X14285806150341
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Image of FIG. 3

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FIG. 3

Assessment of success of specific course components. Bar graphs indicate the number of respondents selecting a particular choice on the survey sheet. Entrance and exit survey questions were identical except where indicated. For the entrance survey, = 14. For the exit survey, = 12. values shown indicate results of a Fisher’s Exact Test performed on the entrance and exit results. values < 0.05 are significant. The value reported in panel D may indicate marginal significance, and the values reported in panels I and J may indicate an important trend. Additional trials for these particular questions would be required to demonstrate strong significance.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2003 vol. 4 no. 1 13-22. doi:10.1128/154288103X14285806150341
Download as Powerpoint

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