1887

Using the Primary Literature in an Allied Health Microbiology Course

    Author: DONALD P. BREAKWELL1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • *Mailing address: Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602. Phone: (801) 422-2378. E-mail: don_breakwell@byu.edu.
    • Copyright © 2003, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2003 vol. 4 no. 1 30-38. doi:10.1128/154288103X14285806272391
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    Abstract:

    A strategy was adapted for using the primary literature to foster active learning in an allied health microbiology course. Recent journal articles were selected that underscored the fundamental microbiological principles to be learned in each course unit. At the beginning of the semester, students were taught the relationship between the layout of scientific articles and the scientific method. During the rest of the semester, students were oriented to the topic of each paper by viewing videos from reading assigned pages from the text, and participating in mini-lectures and discussions. After all preparatory material was completed, a paper was read and discussed in small groups and as a class. Students were assessed using daily reading quizzes and end-of-unit concept quizzes. While reading quizzes averaged approximately 93%, concept quiz grades averaged approximately 82%. Student recognition of the terms used in each unit’s scientific article was assessed with pre-read and post-read wordlists. For the self-assessment, the percent change between pre-read and post-read word cognition was, as expected, highly significant. Approximately 80% of students agreed that reading the scientific articles was a valuable part of the class and that it provided meaning to their study of microbiology. Using the primary scientific literature facilitated active learning in and out of the classroom. This study showed that introducing the scientific literature in an allied health microbiology class can be an effective way of teaching microbiology by providing meaning through the current literature and understanding of the scientific method.

Key Concept Ranking

Food Spoilage Yeast
0.4268449
0.4268449

References & Citations

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/154288103X14285806272391
2003-05-01
2017-09-23

Abstract:

A strategy was adapted for using the primary literature to foster active learning in an allied health microbiology course. Recent journal articles were selected that underscored the fundamental microbiological principles to be learned in each course unit. At the beginning of the semester, students were taught the relationship between the layout of scientific articles and the scientific method. During the rest of the semester, students were oriented to the topic of each paper by viewing videos from reading assigned pages from the text, and participating in mini-lectures and discussions. After all preparatory material was completed, a paper was read and discussed in small groups and as a class. Students were assessed using daily reading quizzes and end-of-unit concept quizzes. While reading quizzes averaged approximately 93%, concept quiz grades averaged approximately 82%. Student recognition of the terms used in each unit’s scientific article was assessed with pre-read and post-read wordlists. For the self-assessment, the percent change between pre-read and post-read word cognition was, as expected, highly significant. Approximately 80% of students agreed that reading the scientific articles was a valuable part of the class and that it provided meaning to their study of microbiology. Using the primary scientific literature facilitated active learning in and out of the classroom. This study showed that introducing the scientific literature in an allied health microbiology class can be an effective way of teaching microbiology by providing meaning through the current literature and understanding of the scientific method.

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FIG. 1

Flow chart representing the overall course design.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2003 vol. 4 no. 1 30-38. doi:10.1128/154288103X14285806272391
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FIG. 2

Figure used in concept quiz question. The figure is adapted from data reported in O’Gara et al. ( 23 ). The legend refers to concentrations of garlic powder used in the original report.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2003 vol. 4 no. 1 30-38. doi:10.1128/154288103X14285806272391
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FIG. 3

Student perceptions of using the scientific literature in an allied health microbiology class. Data represent the percentage of students responding to an end-of-course survey. Approximately 93% of enrolled students participated in the survey.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2003 vol. 4 no. 1 30-38. doi:10.1128/154288103X14285806272391
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FIG. 4

Student perceptions of course format. Data represent the percentage of students responding to an end-of-course survey. Approximately 93% of enrolled students participated in the survey.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2003 vol. 4 no. 1 30-38. doi:10.1128/154288103X14285806272391
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Image of FIG. 5

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FIG. 5

Comparison of observed and predicted percent change in words recognized in a student self-assessment. Predicted data were determined by a mixed model. (List of articles in Table 1 .)

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2003 vol. 4 no. 1 30-38. doi:10.1128/154288103X14285806272391
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