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Restriction Enzyme Digestion Exercise – An In-class Activity

    Author: Michelle Parent1,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Medical Technology and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 20 May 2010
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Medical Technology, 305H Willard Hall, 16 West Main St., Newark, DE 19716. Phone: (302) 831-8591. Fax: (302) 831-4180. E-mail: mparent@udel.edu.
    • Copyright © 2010 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2010 vol. 11 no. 1 56-57. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v1.i2.129
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    Abstract:

    Understanding the concepts of molecular biology and then applying those concepts to laboratory experiments can be challenging to entry-level students. In order to facilitate the topics of restriction enzyme digestion and the generation of compatible ends in the process of gene cloning, an in-class activity was designed. This restriction enzyme digestion exercise, designed for an introductory undergraduate course in genetics, molecular biology and molecular diagnostics, can be utilized in either a lecture or laboratory setting. Students are provided with information on enzyme discovery and origin, sticky, blunt and compatible ends, base-cutters, isoschizomers and isocaudomers. Students then review the components required for restriction enzyme digestion setup, such as DNA concentration, buffer volume and compatibility and multi-enzyme digestions. Upon completion of the theory review, students participate in this classroom activity where scissors and paper replace restriction enzymes and DNA, providing a visual learning experience.

Key Concept Ranking

DNA Restriction Enzymes
0.48782048
0.48782048

References & Citations

1. Greene JJ, Rao VBR1998Recombinant DNA Principles and Methodologies1st edMarcel Dekker, IncNew York
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v1.i2.129
2010-05-20
2017-11-23

Abstract:

Understanding the concepts of molecular biology and then applying those concepts to laboratory experiments can be challenging to entry-level students. In order to facilitate the topics of restriction enzyme digestion and the generation of compatible ends in the process of gene cloning, an in-class activity was designed. This restriction enzyme digestion exercise, designed for an introductory undergraduate course in genetics, molecular biology and molecular diagnostics, can be utilized in either a lecture or laboratory setting. Students are provided with information on enzyme discovery and origin, sticky, blunt and compatible ends, base-cutters, isoschizomers and isocaudomers. Students then review the components required for restriction enzyme digestion setup, such as DNA concentration, buffer volume and compatibility and multi-enzyme digestions. Upon completion of the theory review, students participate in this classroom activity where scissors and paper replace restriction enzymes and DNA, providing a visual learning experience.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

Diagram of paper gene DNA sequence

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2010 vol. 11 no. 1 56-57. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v1.i2.129
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Paper DNA sequence

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2010 vol. 11 no. 1 56-57. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v1.i2.129
Download as Powerpoint

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