1887

Assessing Student Understanding of Host Pathogen Interactions Using a Concept Inventory

    Authors: Gili Marbach-Ad1,*, Volker Briken1, Najib M. El-Sayed1, Kenneth Frauwirth1, Brenda Fredericksen1, Steven Hutcheson1, Lian-Yong Gao1, Sam Joseph1, Vincent T. Lee1, Kevin S. McIver1, David Mosser1, B. Booth Quimby1, Patricia Shields1, Wenxia Song1, Daniel C. Stein1, Robert T. Yuan1, Ann C. Smith1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, College of Chemical and Life Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 17 May 2009
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address for Gili Marbach-Ad: College of Chemical and Life Sciences, University of Maryland, 1328 Symons Hall, College Park, MD 20742, USA. Phone: (301) 405-2075. Fax: (301) 405-1655. E-mail: [email protected]. Mailing address for Ann C. Smith: Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, 1133B Microbiology Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-4451. Phone: (301) 405-5443. E-mail: [email protected].
    • Copyright © 2009, American Society for Microbiology.
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2009 vol. 10 no. 1 43-50. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v10.98
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    Abstract:

    As a group of faculty with expertise and research programs in the area of host-pathogen interactions (HPI), we are concentrating on students’ learning of HPI concepts. As such we developed a concept inventory to measure level of understanding relative to HPI after the completion of a set of microbiology courses (presently eight courses). Concept inventories have been useful tools for assessing student learning, and our interest was to develop such a tool to measure student learning progression in our microbiology courses. Our teaching goal was to create bridges between our courses which would eliminate excessive overlap in our offerings and support a model where concepts and ideas introduced in one course would become the foundation for concept development in successive courses. We developed our HPI concept inventory in several phases. The final product was an 18-question, multiple-choice concept inventory. In fall 2006 and spring 2007 we administered the 18-question concept inventory in six of our courses. We collected pre- and postcourse surveys from 477 students. We found that students taking pretests in the advanced courses retained the level of understanding gained in the general microbiology prerequisite course. Also, in two of our courses there was significant improvement on the scores from pretest to posttest. As we move forward, we will concentrate on exploring the range of HPI concepts addressed in each course and determine and/or create effective methods for meaningful student learning of HPI aspects of microbiology.

Key Concept Ranking

Bacterial Genetics
0.5559051
Escherichia coli
0.51785713
Immune Response
0.49025497
Host-Pathogen Interactions
0.458699
0.5559051

References & Citations

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5. Duschl RA, Schweingruber HA, Shouse AW 2007 Taking science to school: learning and teaching science in grades K-8 The National Academies Press Washington, DC
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15. Marbach-Ad G, Briken V, Frauwirth K, Gao L, Hutcheson S, Joseph S, Mosser D, Parent B, Shields P, Song W, Stein D, Swanson K, Thompson K, Yuan R, Smith AC 2007 A faculty team works to create content linkages among various courses to increase meaningful learning of targeted concepts of microbiology Cell Biol Educ 6 155 162 10.1187/cbe.06-12-0212 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.06-12-0212
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v10.98
2009-05-17
2019-03-21

Abstract:

As a group of faculty with expertise and research programs in the area of host-pathogen interactions (HPI), we are concentrating on students’ learning of HPI concepts. As such we developed a concept inventory to measure level of understanding relative to HPI after the completion of a set of microbiology courses (presently eight courses). Concept inventories have been useful tools for assessing student learning, and our interest was to develop such a tool to measure student learning progression in our microbiology courses. Our teaching goal was to create bridges between our courses which would eliminate excessive overlap in our offerings and support a model where concepts and ideas introduced in one course would become the foundation for concept development in successive courses. We developed our HPI concept inventory in several phases. The final product was an 18-question, multiple-choice concept inventory. In fall 2006 and spring 2007 we administered the 18-question concept inventory in six of our courses. We collected pre- and postcourse surveys from 477 students. We found that students taking pretests in the advanced courses retained the level of understanding gained in the general microbiology prerequisite course. Also, in two of our courses there was significant improvement on the scores from pretest to posttest. As we move forward, we will concentrate on exploring the range of HPI concepts addressed in each course and determine and/or create effective methods for meaningful student learning of HPI aspects of microbiology.

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