1887

“Shovel-ready” Sequences as a Stimulus for the Next Generation of Life Scientists

    Author: Michael D. Boyle1,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA 16652
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 20 May 2010
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biology, Juniata College, Department of Biology, 1700 Moore Street Huntingdon, PA 16652. Phone: (814) 641-3553. Fax: (814) 641-3685. E-mail: Boyle@juniata.edu.
    • Copyright © 2010 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2010 vol. 11 no. 1 38-41. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v11.i1.133
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    Abstract:

    Genomics and bioinformatics are dynamic fields well-suited for capturing the imagination of undergraduates in both research laboratories and classrooms. Currently, raw nucleotide sequence is being provided, as part of several genomics research initiatives, for undergraduate research and teaching. These initiatives could be easily extended and much more effective if the source of the sequenced material and the subsequent focus of the data analysis were aligned with the research interests of individual faculty at undergraduate institutions. By judicious use of surplus capacity in existing nucleotide sequencing cores, raw sequence data could be generated to support ongoing research efforts involving undergraduates. This would allow these students to participate actively in discovery research, with a goal of making novel contributions to their field through original research while nurturing the next generation of talented research scientists.

Key Concept Ranking

Sequence Analysis
0.74345034
DNA
0.4166667
0.74345034

References & Citations

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v11.i1.133
2010-05-20
2017-11-18

Abstract:

Genomics and bioinformatics are dynamic fields well-suited for capturing the imagination of undergraduates in both research laboratories and classrooms. Currently, raw nucleotide sequence is being provided, as part of several genomics research initiatives, for undergraduate research and teaching. These initiatives could be easily extended and much more effective if the source of the sequenced material and the subsequent focus of the data analysis were aligned with the research interests of individual faculty at undergraduate institutions. By judicious use of surplus capacity in existing nucleotide sequencing cores, raw sequence data could be generated to support ongoing research efforts involving undergraduates. This would allow these students to participate actively in discovery research, with a goal of making novel contributions to their field through original research while nurturing the next generation of talented research scientists.

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