1887

Towards Improving the Integration of Undergraduate Biology and Mathematics Education

    Author: Christopher Bergevin1,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85705
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 20 May 2010
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing adress: Department of Mathematics, University of Arizona, P.O. Box 210089, Tucson, AZ 85705-0089; Phone: (520) 626–0655. Fax: (520) 621–8322. E-mail: cbergevin@math.arizona.edu.
    • Copyright © 2010 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2010 vol. 11 no. 1 28-33. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v11.i1.134
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • XML
  • PDF
    205.55 Kb
  • HTML
    43.73 Kb

    Abstract:

    Arguments have recently asserted the need for change in undergraduate biology education, particularly with regard to the role of mathematics. The crux of these protests is that rapidly developing technology is expanding the types of measurements and subsequent data available to biologists. Thus future generations of biologists will require a set of quantitative and analytic skills that will allow them to handle these types of data in order to tackle relevant questions of interest. In this spirit, we describe here strategies (or lessons learned) for undergraduate educators with regard to better preparing undergraduate biology majors for the new types of challenges that lay ahead. The topics covered here span a broad range, from classroom approaches to the administrative level (e.g., fostering inter-departmental communication, student advising) and beyond. A key theme here is the need for an attitude shift with regard to mathematics education by both students and faculty alike. Such a shift will facilitate the development and implementation of new teaching strategies with regard to improving integration of mathematics and biology pedagogy.

Key Concept Ranking

Diffusion
0.75
Lead
0.75
Stems
0.65802103
Oxygen
0.625
Roots
0.5654605
0.75

References & Citations

1. Abbott LF2008Theoretical neuroscience risingNeuron6048949510.1016/j.neuron.2008.10.01918995824 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2008.10.019
2. Bao L, Cai T, Koenig K, Fang K, Han J, Wang J, et al2009Learning and scientific reasoningScience32358658710.1126/science.116774019179514 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1167740
3. Batschelet E1979Introduction to mathematics for life scientists3rd edSpringerBerlin Heidleberg10.1007/978-3-642-61869-7 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-61869-7
4. Bender C, Ward S, Wells MA1994Improving undergraduate biology education in a large research universityMol Biol Cell51291348018999
5. Bialek W, Botstein D2004Introductory science and mathematics education for 21st-century biologistsScience30378879010.1126/science.109548014764865 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1095480
6. Bio 2010: Transforming undergraduate education for future research biologists2003Committee on Undergraduate Biology Education to Prepare Research Scientists for the 21st Century National Research CouncilThe National Academies PressWashington, D.C
7. Courant R, Robbins H1941What is mathematics?: An elementary approach to ideas and methodsOxford University PressNew York, NY
8. de Vries G, Hillen T, Lewis M, Müller J, Schönfisch B2006A course in mathematical biologySIAMPhiladelphia, PA10.1137/1.9780898718256 http://dx.doi.org/10.1137/1.9780898718256
9. Edelstein-Keshet L2005Mathematical models in biologySIAMPhiladelphia, PA10.1137/1.9780898719147 http://dx.doi.org/10.1137/1.9780898719147
10. Gardiner A2008The Princeton companion to mathematics, Part VIII, Section VIII.1955966Princeton University PressPrinceton, NJ
11. Gross LJ2004Interdisciplinarity and the undergraduate biology curriculum: Finding a BalanceCell Biol Ed3859210.1187/cbe.04-03-0040 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.04-03-0040
12. Hobbie RK1997Biological Physics Series. Intermediate physics for medicine and biology3rd edAIP PressMelville, N.Y.
13. Faculty Programs InstitutesAvailable from: (http://www.facultyprograms.org/index.html)
14. Keener J, Sneyd J1998Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics, vol 8 Mathematical physiologySpringerNew York, NY
15. Mahalingam M, Schaefer F, Morlino E2008Promoting student learning through group problem solving in genera chemistry recitationsJ Chem Ed851577158110.1021/ed085p1577 http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ed085p1577
16. Mazur E2009Farewell, lecture?Science323505110.1126/science.116892719119207 http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1168927
17. Murray JD1993Biomathematics, vol 19 Mathematical biology2nd edSpringerNew York, NY
18. Mathematical Biosciences Institute Ohio State UniversityAvailable from: http://mbi.osu.edu/
19. Polya G1945How to solve itPrinceton University PressPrinceton and Oxford
20. Purves WK, Sadava D, Orians GH, Heller HC2001Life: The science of biology6th edSinauer Associates IncNew York, NY
21. Timmer JShould biologists study computer science?2009Available from: (http://arstechnica.com/science/news/2009/07/should-biologists-study-computer-science.ars)
22. Weiss TF1996Cellular biophysics, vol 1MIT PressCambridge, MA
jmbe.v11.i1.134.citations
jmbe/11/1
content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v11.i1.134
Loading

Citations loading...

Supplemental Material

No supplementary material available for this content.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v11.i1.134
2010-05-20
2017-06-24

Abstract:

Arguments have recently asserted the need for change in undergraduate biology education, particularly with regard to the role of mathematics. The crux of these protests is that rapidly developing technology is expanding the types of measurements and subsequent data available to biologists. Thus future generations of biologists will require a set of quantitative and analytic skills that will allow them to handle these types of data in order to tackle relevant questions of interest. In this spirit, we describe here strategies (or lessons learned) for undergraduate educators with regard to better preparing undergraduate biology majors for the new types of challenges that lay ahead. The topics covered here span a broad range, from classroom approaches to the administrative level (e.g., fostering inter-departmental communication, student advising) and beyond. A key theme here is the need for an attitude shift with regard to mathematics education by both students and faculty alike. Such a shift will facilitate the development and implementation of new teaching strategies with regard to improving integration of mathematics and biology pedagogy.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/11/1/jmbe-11-1-28.xml.a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v11.i1.134&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error