1887

It’s All Their Fault?

    Author: Clyde Freeman Herreid1,*
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14260
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 20 May 2010
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biological Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260. Phone: (716) 645-3020. E-mail: [email protected].
    • Copyright © 2010 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2010 vol. 11 no. 1 34-37. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v11.i1.138
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    Abstract:

    Many students fail our introductory science courses and give up on science altogether. How much of this is their fault is debatable. But what is not debatable is that we can improve the situation by using active learning methods. Many faculty claim critical thinking is their highest priority. Their teaching seldom reflects this. They emphasize facts and lecture without context. Most of our students are not going to be scientists, but they are going to be citizens and need to be able to spot inaccuracies when they appear in the media. Case-based and Problem-based Teaching are proven ways to achieve this goal.

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References & Citations

1. American Association for the Advancement of Science Project 2061 1989 Science for all Americans AAAS Washington, D.C.
2. Bergland M, Lundeberg MA, Klyczek K, Hoffman D, Emmons J, Martin C, et al 2006 Exploring biotechnology using case-based multimedia Am Biol Teacher 68 81 86 10.1662/0002-7685(2006)068[0081:EBUCM]2.0.CO;2 http://dx.doi.org/10.1662/0002-7685(2006)068[0081:EBUCM]2.0.CO;2
3. Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) 2008 Scientists in science education: BSCS 1958–2008 Innovation Reform Vision BSCS Colorado Springs, CO
4. Birx J, Foster J 1993 The importance of lecture in general chemistry course performance J Chem Educ 70 180 182 10.1021/ed070p180 http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ed070p180
5. Bloom BS 1956 Taxonomy of educational objectives, the classification of educational goals Handbook I: Cognitive domain David McKay New York
6. Cauffman E, Steinberg L 2000 (Im)maturity of judgment in adolescence: Why adolescents may be less culpable than adults Behavioral Sciences and the Law 18 741 760 10.1002/bsl.416 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bsl.416
7. Dale E 1969 Audio-visual methods in teaching 3rd ed Holt, Rinehart, and Winston Austin, TX
8. Dochy F, Segers M, VandenBossche P, Gijbels D 2003 Effects of problem-based learning: A meta-analysis Learn Instruc 13 533 568 10.1016/S0959-4752(02)00025-7 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0959-4752(02)00025-7
9. Eberlein T, Kampmeier J, Minderhout V, Moog RS, Platt T, Varma-Nelson P, et al 2008 Pedagogies of engagement in science Biochem Molecular Biol Educ 36 262 273 10.1002/bmb.20204 http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bmb.20204
10. Gijbels D, Dochy F, Bossche PV, Segers M 2005 Effects of problem-based learning: A meta-analysis from the angle of assessment Rev Educ Res 75 27 61 10.3102/00346543075001027 http://dx.doi.org/10.3102/00346543075001027
11. Hake RR 1998 Interactive-engagement vs. traditional methods: A six thousand-student survey of mechanics test data for introductory physics courses Am J Phys 66 64 74 10.1119/1.18809 http://dx.doi.org/10.1119/1.18809
12. Herreid CF 1998 Why isn’t cooperative learning used to teach science? BioSc 48 553 559 10.2307/1313317 http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1313317
13. Herreid CF 2006 Clicker cases: Introducing case study teaching into large classrooms J Coll SciTeach 36 43 47
14. Kang H, Lundeberg M, Wolter B, DelMas R, Armstrong N, Borsari B, et al 2009 Giving women a voice and making science relevant: Using personal response systems (“clickers”) with case studies in large lecture classrooms Presented at the European Science Education Research Association (ESERA)conference 31 Aug. – 4 Sept. 2009 Istanbul, Turkey
15. Lebel C, Walker L, Leemans A, Phillips L, Beaulieu C 2008 Microstructural maturation of the human brain from childhood to adulthood Neuroimage 40 1044 1055 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2007.12.053 18295509 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2007.12.053
16. Lord T 2007 Revisiting the cone of learning: Is it a reliable way to link instruction method with knowledge recall? J Coll Sci Teach Nov/Dec 2007
17. Miller J 1988 The five percent problem Am Scientist 72 2 iv
18. National Academy of Sciences 1997 Introducing the national science education standards NAS-NRC: Center for Science, and Engineering Education Washington, DC
19. Paul RW, Elder L, Bartell T 1997 California teacher preparation for instruction in critical thinking: Research findings and policy recommendations California Commission on Teacher Credentialing Foundation for Critical Thinking Dillon Beach, CA
20. Tobias S 1990 They’re not dumb they’re different: Stalking the second tier Research Corporation Tucson, AZ
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23. Yuretich RF 2004 Encouraging critical thinking: Measuring skills in large introductory science classes J Coll Sci Teach 33 40 46

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2010-05-20
2019-03-22

Abstract:

Many students fail our introductory science courses and give up on science altogether. How much of this is their fault is debatable. But what is not debatable is that we can improve the situation by using active learning methods. Many faculty claim critical thinking is their highest priority. Their teaching seldom reflects this. They emphasize facts and lecture without context. Most of our students are not going to be scientists, but they are going to be citizens and need to be able to spot inaccuracies when they appear in the media. Case-based and Problem-based Teaching are proven ways to achieve this goal.

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