1887

Studying Simple and Complex Traits Using Pedigrees Produced From a Large Database

    Author: Cheryld L. Emmons1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: Division of Biology, Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 20 December 2010
    • Supplemental material available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Division of Biology, Alfred University, 1 Saxon Drive, Alfred, NY 14802. Phone: 607-871-2846. Fax: 607-871-2359. E-mail: emmonsc@alfred.edu.
    • Copyright © 2010 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2010 vol. 11 no. 2 156-157. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v11i2.156
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    Abstract:

    Students in genetics classes become familiar with interpreting pedigrees for modes of inheritance of single-gene traits. Non-majors’ genetics courses often have students produce pedigrees of their own families. This exercise provides students with an extensive database, including over 50 families, from which they are asked to produce pedigrees as evidence in support of or refuting suggested models of inheritance for simple traits. Students are also asked to propose modes of inheritance for complex human traits based on pedigrees that they produce from the database. The people in the database are real and include their own families. This makes the exercise more real and personal for the students.

Key Concept Ranking

Chromosomes
1.1647727
Gene
0.8664315
1.1647727

References & Citations

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2. American Heart Association 2010 Heredity as a risk factor [cited 2010 Oct 15] Available from: http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4610.
3. Eiberg H, Mohr J 1987 Major genes of eye color and hair color linked to LU and SE Clin Genet 31 186 191 3568446
4. Eiberg H, Mohr J 1996 Assignment of genes coding for brown eye colour (BEY2) and brown hair colour (HCL3) on chromosome 15q Eur J Hum Genet 4 237 241 8875191
5. Falconer D 1989 Introduction to quantitative genetics 3rd ed. 166 168 John Wiley & Sons New York, NY
6. Felder R, Hironobu S, Xu J, Yu PY, Wang Z, Watanabe H, et al 2002 G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 gene variants in human essential hypertension PNAS 99 3872 3877 10.1073/pnas.062694599 11904438 122616 http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.062694599
7. Han J, Kraft P, Nan H, Guo Q, Chen C, Qureshi A, et al 2008 A Genome-wide association study identifies novel alleles associated with hair color and skin pigmentation PLoS Genet 4 e1000074 10.1371/journal.pgen.1000074 18483556 2367449 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1000074
8. Klar A 1996 A single locus, RGHT, specifies preference for hand utilization in humans Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol 61 59 65 10.1101/SQB.1996.061.01.009 9246435 http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/SQB.1996.061.01.009
9. Rees J 2000 The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R): more than just red hair Pigment Cell Res 13 135 140 10.1034/j.1600-0749.2000.130303.x 10885670 http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0749.2000.130303.x
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v11i2.156
2010-12-20
2017-09-23

Abstract:

Students in genetics classes become familiar with interpreting pedigrees for modes of inheritance of single-gene traits. Non-majors’ genetics courses often have students produce pedigrees of their own families. This exercise provides students with an extensive database, including over 50 families, from which they are asked to produce pedigrees as evidence in support of or refuting suggested models of inheritance for simple traits. Students are also asked to propose modes of inheritance for complex human traits based on pedigrees that they produce from the database. The people in the database are real and include their own families. This makes the exercise more real and personal for the students.

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