1887

Development of a DNA Bar-coding Project as a Biology Laboratory Module

    Authors: David Dunbar1,*, Caroline Nielsen1
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    Affiliations: 1: Science Department, Cabrini College, Radnor, PA 19087
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 20 December 2010
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address. Science Department, Cabrini College, 610 King of Prussia Road, Radnor, PA 19087. Phone: 610-902-8770. Fax: 610-902-8285. E-mail: ddunbar@cabrini.edu.
    • Copyright © 2010 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2010 vol. 11 no. 2 160-161. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v11i2.179
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    Abstract:

    This article is intended for faculty who are looking for new techniques for teaching a genetics or molecular ecology lab. We have used the bar-coding protocol for both a non-majors watershed ecology lab and a majors-specific genetics lab with equal success. The exercise involves extracting mitochondrial DNA from animal tissue, amplifying a portion of the mitochondrial DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequencing the amplified DNA to determine the animal to the species level. Logistically, time spent on the DNA bar-coding procedure could be as short as 2–3 weeks or last an entire semester, depending on course outcomes and time availability.

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References & Citations

1. Ratnasingham S, Hebert PD 2007 BOLD: The barcode of live data system Mol Ecol Notes 7 3 355 364 10.1111/j.1471-8286.2007.01678.x 1890991 http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-8286.2007.01678.x
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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v11i2.179
2010-12-20
2017-11-22

Abstract:

This article is intended for faculty who are looking for new techniques for teaching a genetics or molecular ecology lab. We have used the bar-coding protocol for both a non-majors watershed ecology lab and a majors-specific genetics lab with equal success. The exercise involves extracting mitochondrial DNA from animal tissue, amplifying a portion of the mitochondrial DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequencing the amplified DNA to determine the animal to the species level. Logistically, time spent on the DNA bar-coding procedure could be as short as 2–3 weeks or last an entire semester, depending on course outcomes and time availability.

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