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Create a Bacterium: an Engaging Semester-Long Assignment

    Author: Min-Ken Liao1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Biology Department, Furman University, Greenville, SC 29613
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 20 December 2010
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: Biology Department, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway, Greenville, SC 29613. Phone: 864-294-3246. Fax: 864-294-2058. E-mail: min-ken.liao@furman.edu.
    • Copyright © 2010 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2010 vol. 11 no. 2 168-171. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v11i2.198
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    Abstract:

    Like many other educators, I have adapted the “Adopt a Bacterium” exercise developed by Dr. Amy Cheng Vollmer for use in my microbiology course. Building upon the success of the “Adopt a Bacterium,” I developed the “Create a Bacterium” exercise aiming to challenge even more my upper-level undergraduate science majors. To create a bacterium, students not only had to search for and organize information, but also to analyze and evaluate information (higher-order learning skills). Most importantly, students were challenged to engage in the highest level of the cognitive domain of Bloom’s revised taxonomy, synthesis or creation.

References & Citations

1. Volmer AC 2004 Teaching students to write short documents for diverse audiences 7 8 Johnson C Great ideas in teaching microbiology, vol 1 Benjamin Cummings San Francisco, CA
2. Liao M-K 2010 Create a bacterium: an engaging semester-long project. Presented at: 17th Annual ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators, 20–23 May, 2010, San Diego, CA J Microbiol Biol Ed 11 95
3. Anderson L, Krathwohl DE 2001 A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: a revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives [Abridged] Longman New York, NY
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2010-12-20
2017-11-24

Abstract:

Like many other educators, I have adapted the “Adopt a Bacterium” exercise developed by Dr. Amy Cheng Vollmer for use in my microbiology course. Building upon the success of the “Adopt a Bacterium,” I developed the “Create a Bacterium” exercise aiming to challenge even more my upper-level undergraduate science majors. To create a bacterium, students not only had to search for and organize information, but also to analyze and evaluate information (higher-order learning skills). Most importantly, students were challenged to engage in the highest level of the cognitive domain of Bloom’s revised taxonomy, synthesis or creation.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

The sequence of events for the Create a Bacterium exercise.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2010 vol. 11 no. 2 168-171. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v11i2.198
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

Decision-making flowchart to guide students to create bacteria of interest.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2010 vol. 11 no. 2 168-171. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v11i2.198
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