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Antiviral Drug Research Proposal Activity

    Authors: Lisa Injaian1, Ann C. Smith1, Jennifer German Shipley1, Gili Marbach-Ad1, Brenda Fredericksen1,*
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    Affiliations: 1: University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 19 May 2011
    • Supplemental material available at http://jmbe.asm.org
    • *Corresponding author. Mailing address: 3126 Bioscience Research Building, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. Phone: (301) 405-1251. Fax: 301-314-1248. E-mail: [email protected].
    • Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2011 vol. 12 no. 1 18-28. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.269
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    Abstract:

    The development of antiviral drugs provides an excellent example of how basic and clinical research must be used together in order to achieve the final goal of treating disease. A Research Oriented Learning Activity was designed to help students to better understand how basic and clinical research can be combined toward a common goal. Through this project students gained a better understanding of the process of scientific research and increased their information literacy in the field of virology. The students worked as teams to research the many aspects involved in the antiviral drug design process, with each student becoming an “expert” in one aspect of the project. The Antiviral Drug Research Proposal (ADRP) culminated with students presenting their proposals to their peers and local virologists in a poster session. Assessment data showed increased student awareness and knowledge of the research process and the steps involved in the development of antiviral drugs as a result of this activity.

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References & Citations

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8. Marbach-Ad G, Briken V, Frauwirth K, Gao LY, Hutchenson S, Joseph S, et al 2007 A faculty team works to create content linkages among various courses to increase meaningful learning of targeted concepts of microbiology CBE Life Sci Educ 6 155 162 10.1187/cbe.06-12-0212 17548877 1885905 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.06-12-0212
9. Marbach-Ad G, McAdams K, Benson S, Briken V, Cathcart L, Chase M, et al 2010 A model for using a concept inventory as a tool for students’ assessment and faculty professional development CBE Life Sci Educ 9 408 436 10.1187/cbe.10-05-0069 21123686 2995757 http://dx.doi.org/10.1187/cbe.10-05-0069
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2011-05-19
2019-03-23

Abstract:

The development of antiviral drugs provides an excellent example of how basic and clinical research must be used together in order to achieve the final goal of treating disease. A Research Oriented Learning Activity was designed to help students to better understand how basic and clinical research can be combined toward a common goal. Through this project students gained a better understanding of the process of scientific research and increased their information literacy in the field of virology. The students worked as teams to research the many aspects involved in the antiviral drug design process, with each student becoming an “expert” in one aspect of the project. The Antiviral Drug Research Proposal (ADRP) culminated with students presenting their proposals to their peers and local virologists in a poster session. Assessment data showed increased student awareness and knowledge of the research process and the steps involved in the development of antiviral drugs as a result of this activity.

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Figures

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FIGURE 1

. Top: Timeline of project phases. Bottom: Phase explanations followed by Bloom level (BL) where levels 4 through 6 are higher-order cognitive skills, as described by Crowe et al. ( 3 , 4 ).

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2011 vol. 12 no. 1 18-28. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.269
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Image of FIGURE 2

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FIGURE 2

. This figure illustrates how the teams were established for 60 students. Each number in the table represents a student in the class. For example, student 15 was a member of virus team 5 and specialty team 2.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2011 vol. 12 no. 1 18-28. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.269
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Image of FIGURE 3

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FIGURE 3

Students were given statements that pertained to the development of antiviral drugs prior to and following the learning activity. The students were given the prompts: agree, disagree and don’t know and asked to explain their answers. Responses from 60 students were tabulated in the pre-project survey and 50 in the post-project survey. Prior to releasing an antiviral drug as a treatment for disease, the drug is first tested in one animal model (for example in a mouse model or in a rabbit model), if no complications are observed, the drug is then tested in humans (clinical trials). Viruses rapidly develop resistance to antiviral drugs.

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2011 vol. 12 no. 1 18-28. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.269
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Image of FIGURE 4

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FIGURE 4

Students were asked to respond to prompts regarding their awareness of ongoing research

Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2011 vol. 12 no. 1 18-28. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v12i1.269
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