1887

Early Embryonic Development Role-Playing in a Large Introductory Biology Lecture

    Author: John R. Geiser1
    VIEW AFFILIATIONS HIDE AFFILIATIONS
    Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008-5410
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 01 December 2011
    • Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Biological Sciences Western Michigan University, 1903 West Michigan Avenue, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008-5410. Phone: 269.387.5392. Fax: 269.387.5609. E-mail: john.geiser@wmich.edu.
    • Copyright © 2011 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. December 2011 vol. 12 no. 2 202-203. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v12i2.315
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.
  • PDF
    192.06 Kb
  • HTML
    16.18 Kb
  • XML

    Abstract:

    Animal development in introductory biology texts is generally described as a series of four coordinated and controlled phases of cell growth and movement: Body Axis, Segmentation, Segment Structures/Characteristics and, finally, Differentiation. In an ongoing effort to reform my teaching practices and place my introductory biology lectures within the context of student’s lives, I began teaching the development chapter as one possible outcome of the transcription and translational processes. During this process, I realized that students were having difficulty visualizing what was happening during early embryonic development. This activity was created to expose students to early embryonic development by making them move and change in a manner similar to what a cell in the embryo might undergo.

Key Concept Ranking

Cell Movements
0.6377804
Transcription
0.422549
0.6377804

References & Citations

jmbe.v12i2.315.citations
jmbe/12/2
content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v12i2.315
Loading

Citations loading...

Supplemental Material

No supplementary material available for this content.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v12i2.315
2011-12-01
2017-09-23

Abstract:

Animal development in introductory biology texts is generally described as a series of four coordinated and controlled phases of cell growth and movement: Body Axis, Segmentation, Segment Structures/Characteristics and, finally, Differentiation. In an ongoing effort to reform my teaching practices and place my introductory biology lectures within the context of student’s lives, I began teaching the development chapter as one possible outcome of the transcription and translational processes. During this process, I realized that students were having difficulty visualizing what was happening during early embryonic development. This activity was created to expose students to early embryonic development by making them move and change in a manner similar to what a cell in the embryo might undergo.

Highlighted Text: Show | Hide
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmbe/12/2/jmbe-12-2-202.xml.a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v12i2.315&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Please check the format of the address you have entered.
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error