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Informing Pedagogy Through the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model

    Author: Mariale Hardiman1
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    Affiliations: 1: School of Education, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218
    AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION AUTHOR AND ARTICLE INFORMATION
    • Published 03 May 2012
    • Author’s mailing address: School of Education, Johns Hopkins University, 2800 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218. Phone: 410-516-6550. Fax: 410-516-3939. E-mail: mmhardiman@jhu.edu.
    • Copyright © 2012 American Society for Microbiology
    Source: J. Microbiol. Biol. Educ. May 2012 vol. 13 no. 1 11-16. doi:10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.354
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    Abstract:

    Improving teaching to foster creative thinking and problem-solving for students of all ages will require two essential changes in current educational practice. First, to allow more time for deeper engagement with material, it is critical to reduce the vast number of topics often required in many courses. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is the alignment of pedagogy with recent research on cognition and learning. With a growing focus on the use of research to inform teaching practices, educators need a pedagogical framework that helps them interpret and apply research findings. This article describes the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model, a scheme that relates six distinct aspects of instruction to research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences.

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/content/journal/jmbe/10.1128/jmbe.v13i1.354
2012-05-03
2017-09-21

Abstract:

Improving teaching to foster creative thinking and problem-solving for students of all ages will require two essential changes in current educational practice. First, to allow more time for deeper engagement with material, it is critical to reduce the vast number of topics often required in many courses. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is the alignment of pedagogy with recent research on cognition and learning. With a growing focus on the use of research to inform teaching practices, educators need a pedagogical framework that helps them interpret and apply research findings. This article describes the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model, a scheme that relates six distinct aspects of instruction to research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences.

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